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NameEmailPhd ProgramResearch InterestsPublications
Abel, Kristina email , , , publications

Our research focuses on the immunological aspects of pathogen-host interactions. The lab is actively involved in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine studies using the nonhuman primate model of SIV infection. We are particularly interested in pediatric HIV transmission by breast-feeding and the early, local host immune response. A main research focus is on developmental differences in host immune responses between infants and adults and how they alter pathogenesis. The effect of co-infections (e.g. malaria and Tb) on HIV pathogenesis and transmission is a second research focus. The lab is developing a nonhuman primate model of SIV-Plasmodium fragile co-infection to study HIV-P. falciparum infection in humans.

Ahmed, Shawn email , , , , , publications

Our research group utilizes the nematode C. elegans to investigate germ cell immortality: mechanisms that allow germ cells remain eternally youthful as they are transmitted from one generation to the next. We also study how telomerase functions at chromosome termini, as well as the consequences of telomere dysfunction.

Ainslie, Kristy M email , , , , publications

We have several areas of research interest broadly in the area of immunomodulation using micro/nanoparticles and other carrier systems.  This can include development of traditional vaccines, therapeutic autoimmune vaccines and classic drug delivery platforms targeted to bacterial, viral or parasitic host cells.  To this end, we also seek to develop new materials and platforms optimal for use in modulating immune responses as well as developing scalable production of micro/nanoparticles.

Allbritton, Nancy email , , , , publications

The overall focus of the laboratory is to quantitatively measure the activity of proteins in cellular signaling networks to understand the relationships of these intracellular pathways in regulating cell health and disease. These networks are composed of interacting proteins and small molecules that work together in a concerted manner to regulate the cell in response to its environment. Despite the importance of these key signaling molecules in controlling the behavior of cells, most of these proteins and metabolites can not be quantified in single cells. There is a need throughout biology for new technologies to identify and understand the molecular circuits within single cells. A research goal is to develop new methods that will broaden the range of measurements possible at the single-cell level and then to utilize these methods to address fundamental biologic questions. We are pursuing this task by bringing to bear diverse techniques from chemistry, physics, biology and engineering to develop new analytical tools to track signal transduction within individual cells. Our research is a multidisciplinary program for the development and application of new analytical methods with two main focus areas: 1) techniques to monitor cellular signaling, and 2) microfabricated cellular analysis systems.

Amelio, Antonio L. email , , , , , , publications

Our laboratory is broadly interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by cell signaling pathways and the role of pathway cross-talk in cancer biology. In particular, the cAMP signaling cascade directs adaptive cellular responses to a variety of stress stimuli via a combination of acute affects arising from GS-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated activation of PKA and long-term affects resulting from transcriptional reprogramming directed by CREB and the CREB Regulated Transcription Coactivators (CTRCs). We are applying an interdisciplinary approach to study the consequences of aberrant activation of the cAMP/CREB/CRTC signal circuit on these adaptive responses and how cooperative signaling with other pathways promotes oncogenic processes in oral, head, and neck cancers.

Anton, Eva email , , , , , publications

Laminar organization of neurons in cerebral cortex is critical for normal brain function. Two distinct cellular events guarantee the emergence of laminar organization– coordinated sequence of neuronal migration, and generation of radial glial cells that supports neurogenesis and neuronal migration. Our goal is to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal migration and layer formation in the mammalian cerebral cortex. Towards this goal, we are studying the following three related questions: 1. What are the signals that regulate the establishment, development and differentiation of radial glial cells, a key substrate for neuronal migration and a source of new neurons in cerebral cortex?2. What are the signals for neuronal migration that determine how neurons reach their appropriate positions in the developing cerebral cortex?3. What are the specific cell-cell adhesion related mechanisms that determine how neurons migrate and coalesce into distinct layers in the developing cerebral cortex?

Archer, Trevor email , , , publications

Molecular carcinogenesis: cancer, chromatin, transcription, and epigenetics

Arendshorst, William email , , , , publications

We study mechanisms of cellular and molecular function as they control cardiovascular and kidney physiology in health and disease. We focus on G-protein coupled receptors and calcium signaling pathways of resistance arterioles that regulate vascular resistance in normal kidneys and pathophysiologically such as those of animals with genetic hypertension or animals with genes deleted. Measurements include renal vascular reactivity to neurohormonal agents and autacrine/paracrine factors combined with parallel investigation of receptor/calcium signal transduction in vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro.

Asokan, Aravind email , , , , , publications

Our research group is focused on combining the tools and principles of molecular biology and genetics with chemistry to generate a synthetic viral toolkit. The lab-derived synthetic viral entities are utilized to dissect mechanisms of viral tissue tropism, as new reagents for applications in genomics and proteomics and as new vectors for human gene therapy applications.

Baldwin, Albert S. email , , , , , publications

Our laboratory studies an amazing regulatory factor known as NF-kappaB. This transcription factor controls key developmental and immunological functions and its dysregulation lies at the heart of virtually all major human diseases.

Batrakova, Elena email , , publications

What if you can target and deliver a drug directly to the side of disease in the body? It is possible, when you use smart living creatures pro-inflammatory response cells, such as monocytes, T-lymphocytes or dendritic cells. You can load these cells with the drug and inject these carriers into the blood stream. They will migrate to the inflammation site (for example, across the blood brain barrier) and release the drug. Thus, you can reduce the inflammation and protect the cells (for example, neurons) in patients with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer diseases.

Bautch, Victoria email , , , , , publications

Blood vessel formation in cancer and development; use mouse culture (stem cell derived vessels) and in vivo models (embryos and tumors); genetic, cell and molecular biological tools; how do vessels assemble and pattern?, dynamic image analysis.

Bear, James E. email , , , , , , publications

Our lab uses a combination of genetics, high-resolution cellular and animal imaging, animal tumor models and microfluidic approaches to study the problems of cell motility and cytoskeletal organization. We are particularly interested in 1) How cells sense cues in their environment and respond with directed migration, 2) How the actin cytoskeleton is organized at the leading edge of migrating cells and 3) How these processes contribute to tumor metastasis.

Beck, Melinda A. email , , publications

My laboratory studies the relationship between host nutrition and the immune response to infectious disease. Using a mouse model of obesity, we are exploring the mechanism(s) for high mortality from influenza infection in obese mice compared with lean mice. We also have an ongoing clinical research study designed to understand the mechanism(s) involved that impair the influenza vaccine response in obese adults compared with healthy weight adults. We have also demonstrated that host deficiencies in antioxidant nutrients can lead to viral mutations resulting in an avirulent pathogen becoming virulent, suggesting that the host nutritional status can be a driving force for the evolution of viruses.

Beckers, Con email , , , , publications

We study the cell biology of the protozoan parasites that cause Toxoplasmosis and Malaria, especially the mechanism and control of parasite motility and host cell interaction.

Belger, Aysenil email , , , publications

Dr. Belger’s research focuses on studies of the cortical circuits underlying attention and executive function in the human brain, as well as the breakdown in these functions in neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopment disorders such as schizophrenia and autism.  Her research also examines changes in cortical circuits and their physiological properties in individuals at high risk for psychotic disorders.  Dr. Belger combines functional magnetic resonance imaging, electrophysiological scalp recording, experimental psychology and neuropsychological assessment techniques to explore the behavioral and neurophysiological dimensions of higher order executive functions.  Her most recent research projects have begun focusing on electrophysiological abnormalities in young autistic children and individuals at high risk for schizophrenia.

Bellinger, Dwight A. email , publications

Research interests include atherosclerosis, thrombosis and von Willebrand’s disease. The role of von Willebrand factor in arterial thrombosis is being studied in atherosclerotic vessels to gain a better understanding of thrombosis and its possible prevention in people with coronary artery disease. Comparative pathology and the use of animal models in research are also the focus of some research efforts.

Bencharit, Sompop email , , , , , publications

Dr. Bencharit has his research interests in structural biology and its applications to human diseases in particular the role of signaling proteins involved in vessel development and clinical diagnostic applications of mass spectrometry based proteomics. His current laboratory research includes (1) structural and functional studies of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), a genetic disorder resulting in vascular defects in the brain causing hemorrhagic stroke; and (2) salivary and tissue proteomic analyses for novel biomarker discovery.

Bennett, Brian email , , , , , publications

Chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis have both genetic and environmental risk factors, but understanding the complex interactions between susceptibility genes and the environment has been difficult.  The Bennett Lab uses integrative genetic studies, also called systems genetics, to elucidate the genetic component of these chronic metabolic diseases.  In particular we are interested in how genetics and diet interactions lead to increased cardiovascular disease.

Berg, Jonathan email , , , , , publications

My research group is broadly interested in the application of sequencing technologies in medical genetics and genomics, using a combination of wet lab and computational approaches.  As a clinician, I am actively involved in the care of patients with hereditary disorders, and the research questions that my group investigates have direct relevance to patient care.  One project uses genome sequencing in families with likely hereditary cancer susceptibility in order to identify novel genes that may be involved in monogenic forms of cancer predisposition.  Another major avenue of investigation examines the use of genome-scale sequencing in clinical medicine, ranging from diagnostic testing to newborn screening, to screening in healthy adults.

Bergmeier, Wolfgang email , , , , publications

Our research focuses on the adhesion mechanisms of platelets and neutrophils to sites of vascular injury/ activation. For successful adhesion, both cell types rely on activation-dependent receptors (integrins) expressed on the cell surface. We are particularly interested in the role of calcium (Ca2+) as a signaling molecule that regulates the inside-out activation of integrin receptors. Our studies combine molecular and biochemical approaches with microfluidics and state-of-the-art in vivo imaging (intravital microscopy) techniques.

Berkowitz, Max email , , , , publications

We study interactions of proteins and peptides with membranes. Specifically we study the interaction of the A-beta peptide with lipids in the membrane. It is well known that Alzheimer’s is an aggregation disorder with A-beta being the aggregating species. However, it is unknown what initiates this aggregation. Experimental evidence has shown that A-beta peptides will undergo a conformational change to an aggregate structure when interacting with surfaces of certain lipid membranes. It is of interest to our group to understand what causes this conformational change and what properties of lipids most promote this effect.  We also study structural and dynamical properties of biomembranes containing cholesterol.  The goal of our research on structural and dynamical properties of membranes containing cholesterol is to gain knowledge about the nature of phospholipid-cholesterol interactions that play an important role in functioning of membranes, in cell communications and in formation of domains called lipid rafts. Detailed knowledge of the membrane properties helps us to understand the normal functioning of cells and it is instrumental in the search for a cure from a large variety of diseases. We use computer simulation techniques to perform our studies.  Member of the Molecular & Cellular Biophysics Training Program

Besheer, Joyce email , , publications

Research in my lab examines the neurobiological mechanisms underlying alcoholism and addiction. At present studies are focused on the interaction between stress-related systems and sensitivity to alcohol, in order to better understand the mechanisms that underlie increased alcohol drinking during stressful episodes. We use an array of behavioral (e.g., operant self-administration, drug discrimination) and behavioral pharmacology techniques, including targeted brain regional drug injections, to functionally evaluate the role of specific molecular targets. In parallel to the behavioral studies, we use immunohistochemistry and Western blot techniques to examine alterations in the expression of various molecular targets following stress exposure. We are also applying these techniques to examine and integrate the study of depression that emerges following stress hormone exposure.

Bloom, Kerry email , , , , publications

Our objective is to understand the dynamic and structural properties of chromosomes during mitosis.  We use live cell imaging techniques to address how kinetochores are assembled, capture microtubules and promote faithful segregation of chromosomes.

Boettiger, Charlotte email , , , , publications

My lab uses a cognitive neuroscience approach to understand the neurobiology of drug addiction in humans. The tools we use include fMRI, cognitive testing, physiological monitoring, pharmacology, and genetic testing. We specifically seek to determine 1) how the brain learns new stimulus-response associations and replaces learned associations, 2) the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the tendency to select immediate over delayed rewards, and 3) the neural bases of addiction-related attentional bias.

Bourret, Bob email , , , , publications

Our long term goal is to define the molecular mechanisms of two-component regulatory systems, which are utilized for signal transduction by bacteria, archaea, eukaryotic microorganisms, and plants.  Our current focus is to understand the features that control the rates of self-catalyzed phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of response regulator proteins.  The kinetics of these reactions vary dramatically (>40,000x) between different pathways and reflect the need to synchronize biological responses (e.g. behavior, development, physiology, virulence) to environmental stimuli.  Member of the Molecular & Cellular Biophysics Training Program

Bowers, Albert A email , , , , publications

Research in the Bowers lab focuses on investigation of structure activity relationships and mechanisms of action of natural product-derived small molecule therapeutics.  We employ a variety of methods to build and modify compounds of interest, including manipulation of natural product biosynthesis, chemical synthesis, and semi-synthesis.  One major area of research in the lab is the rationale engineering of biosynthetic pathways to make bacterial drug factories.  Compounds targeting transcriptional regulation of cancer as well as multi-drug resistant venereal infections are currently under investigation in the lab.

Braunstein, Miriam email , , , , publications

Our research focuses on understanding the virulence mechanisms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium responsible for the disease tuberculosis.

Breese, George email , , , , , publications

This multidisciplinary laboratory has 6 interests: 1) Defining regionally specific adaptations responsible for functions altered by chronic ethanol;  2) Characterizing regional CNS biochemical changes induced by stress and CRF after chronic ethanol;  3) Defining the role of central cytokines in behaviors induced by stress; 4) Exploring how a benzodiazepine (BZD) agonist shares actions with a BZD antagonist;  5) Defining TRH receptor subtype(s) responsible for its anti-anxiety and analeptic actions;  and  6) Defining the action of galanin on ethanol withdrawal-induced anxiety.  To undertake our interests, behavioral, anatomical, pharmacological, electrophysiological, biochemical, and molecular biological approaches are used.

Brenman, Jay email , , , , , , publications

The Brenman lab studies how a universal energy and stress sensor, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates cellular function and signaling.  AMPK is proposed to be a therapeutic target for Type 2 diabetes and Metabolic syndrome (obesity, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease). In addition, AMPK can be activated by LKB1, a known human tumor suppressor. Thus AMPK signaling is not only relevant to diabetes but also cancer.  We are interested in molecular genetic and biochemical approaches to understand how AMPK contributes to neurodegeneration, metabolism/cardiac disease and cancer.

Brennwald, Patrick email , , , , , publications

We are interested in the mechanism by which eukaryotic cells are polarized and the role of vesicle transport plays in the determination and regulation of cell polarity and tumorigenesis.

Brouwer, Kim email , , , publications

Research in the Brouwer laboratory is focused on: (1) hepatic transport of xenobiotics, including mechanisms of uptake, translocation, and biliary excretion; (2) development/refinement of in vitro model systems to predict in vivo hepatobiliary disposition, drug interactions, and hepatotoxicity; (3) influence of disease (e.g., NASH, kidney disease) on hepatobiliary drug disposition; and (4) pharmacokinetics.

Brustad, Eric M email , , , publications

The Brustad group is interested in applying chemical principles to expand biological systems beyond Nature’s design. We make use of developing technologies such as unnatural amino acid mutagenesis and non-natural cofactor design to increase the chemical functionality available to proteins. Current efforts are directed towards the genetic incorporation of organocofactor mimics as well as heme protein engineering through the incorporation of orthogonal metalloporphyrin scaffolds. We combine methods in synthetic chemistry, molecular biology, X-ray crystallography, and directed evolution to optimize the function of our protein engineering efforts.

Bultman, Scott email , , , , publications

Our lab is interested in the role of chromatin-modifying factors and epigenetics in mammalian development and disease. We are particularly interested in two major areas both of which make use of mouse models: (1) the role of BRG1 and SWI/SNF nucleosome-remodeling complexes in various aspects of hematopoiesis including regulation of globin gene expression and inflammation; (2) the role of dietary fiber and gut microflora on histone modifications, CpG methylation, and prevention of colorectal cancer.

Burch, Christina email , , , , , , publications

Experimental Evolution of Viruses.  We use both computational and experimental approaches to understand how viruses adapt to their host environment.  Our research attempts to determine how genome complexity constrains adaptation, and how virus ecology and genetics interact to determine whether a virus will shift to utilizing new host.  In addition, we are trying to develop a framework for predicting which virus genes will contribute to adaptation in particular ecological scenarios such as frequent co-infection of hosts by multiple virus strains.  For more information, and for advice on applying to graduate school at UNC, check out my lab website www.unc.edu/~cburch/lab.

Burks, Wesley email , , , , publications

The UNC Food Allergy Institute (UNCFAI) was established in 2012 to address the growing needs of children and adults with food allergy. Program investigators study the biologic basis of food allergy in the laboratory and in clinical research studies seeking to better understand the role of allergen-specific IgE and the mechanism of allergen immunotherapy. The Institute provides comprehensive, family-centered patient care for food allergy, food-related anaphylaxis, and other related disorders like atopic dermatitis and eosinophilic esophagitis.

Burmeister, Sabrina S. email , , , , publications

Sensory neurobiology of animal communication, sensory-endocrine interactions and evolution of the brain.

Burridge, Keith email , , , , publications

Cell adhesion, both to other cells and to ECM, signaling, the cytoskeleton and cell migration. The Rho family of GTPases, their regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GAPs. Inflammation and leukocyte transendothelial migration.

Cairns, Bruce A. email , , , , publications

The immune system of severely burned patients becomes extremely suppressed after injury. An overwhelming number of patients die from wound infection and sepsis. However, we are unable to graft these patients with skin from other donors as their immune system is still able to reject the graft efficiently. Our inability to cover the wound site leaves the patients further open to bacterial and fungal infections. Our laboratory investigates the translational immune mechanisms for these devastating consequences of burn. Focuses in the lab include1)* *investigation of innate molecule control of both the innate and adaptive immune systems after burn injury, 2) effect of burn on viral reactivation after burn injury, 3) consequences of burn injury on host response to bacterial pathogenicity  and 4) wound healing and skin allo-tolerance mediated by embryonic stem cells.

Calabrese, J. Mauro email , , , , , , , , , publications

Our lab is trying to understand the mechanisms by which long noncoding RNAs orchestrate the epigenetic control of gene expression. Relevant examples of this type of gene regulation occur in the case of X-chromosome inactivation and autosomal imprinting. We specialize in genomics, but rely a combination of techniques –  including genetics, proteomics, and molecular, cell and computational biology — to study these processes in both mouse and human stem and somatic cell systems.

Campbell, Sharon email , , , , publications

Current research projects in the Campbell laboratory include structural, biophysical and biochemical studies of wild type and variant Ras and Rho family GTPase proteins, as well as the identification, characterization and structural elucidation of factors that act on these GTPases.  Ras and Rho proteins are members of a large superfamily of related guanine nucleotide binding proteins.  They are key regulators of signal transduction pathways that control cell growth. Rho GTPases regulate signaling pathways that also modulate cell morphology and actin cytoskeletal organization.  Mutated Ras proteins are found in 30% of human cancers and promote uncontrolled cell growth, invasion, and metastasis. Another focus of the lab is in biochemical and biophysical characterization of the cell adhesion proteins, focal adhesion kinase, vinculin, paxillin and palladin.  These proteins are involved in actin cytoskeletal rearrangements and cell motility, amongst other functions. Most of our studies are conducted in collaboration with laboratories that focus on molecular and cellular biological aspects of these problems. This allows us to direct cell-based signaling, motility and transformation analyses. Member of the Molecular & Cellular Biophysics Training Program.

Carelli, Regina M. email , , , , publications

Research in the Carelli laboratory is in the area of behavioral neuroscience.  Our studies focus on the neurobiological basis of motivated behaviors, including drug addiction. Electrophysiology and electrochemistry procedures are used during behavior to examine the role of the brain ‘reward’ circuit in natural (e.g., food) versus drug (e.g., cocaine) reward.   Studies incorporate classical and operant conditioning procedures to study the role of the nucleus accumbens (and dopamine) and associated brain regions in learning and memory, as they relate to motivated behaviors.

Caron, Kathleen email , , , , , publications

Gene targeting and state-of-the-art phenotyping methods are used to elucidate the reproductive and cardiovascular roles of the adrenomedullin system and to characterize the novel GPCR-signaling mechanism of Adm’s receptor and RAMP’s.

Carter, Charles email , , , , , , publications

Molecular evolution and mechanistic enzymology find powerful synergy in our study of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which translate the genetic code. Class I Tryptophanyl-tRNA Synthetase stores free energy as conformational strain imposed by long-range, interactions on the minimal catalytic domain (MCD) when it binds ATP.  We study how this allostery works using X-ray crystallography, bioinformatics, molecular dynamics, enzyme kinetics, and thermodynamics. As coding sequences for class I and II MCDs have significant complementarity, we also pursuing their sense/antisense ancestry.  Member of the Molecular & Cellular Biophysics Training Program.

Chen, Xian email , , , , publications

Developing and applying novel mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics methodologies for high throughput identification, quantification, and characterization of the pathologically relevant changes in protein expression, post-translational modifications (PTMs), and protein-protein interactions.  Focuses in the lab include: 1) technology development for comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analysis, 2) investigation of systems regulation in toll-like receptor-mediated pathogenesis and 3) proteomic-based mechanistic investigation of stress-induced cellular responses/effects in cancer pathogenesis.

Cheney, Richard email , , , , , , publications

Our goal is to understand the fundamental cell biology underlying processes such as neurodevelopment, angiogenesis, and the metastasis of cancer cells.  Most of our experiments focus on molecular motors such as myosin-X and on the finger-like structures known as filopodia.  We generally utilize advanced imaging techniques such as TIRF and single-molecule imaging in conjunction with mammalian cell culture.  We also  use molecular biology and biochemistry and are in the process of developing a mouse model to investigate the functions of myosin-X and filopodia.   We are looking for experimentally driven students who have strong interests in understanding the molecular basis of dynamic cellular processes such as filopodial extension, mechanosensing, and cell migration.

Cho, M. J. email , publications

The Cho lab has been interested in cellular delivery of macromolecular therapeutics such as siRNA. In particular, research projects focus on development of means to transfer the content of endosome to cytosol during endocytic cellular uptake. Two major approaches we have been pursuing are transient osmotic swelling and rupture of endosome and acid-activated, membrane-permeabilizing detergent.

Church, Frank C. email , , , , , , publications

Our research is concerned with proteases and their inhibitors in various disease processes (thrombosis and cancer); our science tools are structure-activity, cell biology and signaling, pathobiology, immunohistochemistry, and in vivo models.

Clemmons, David R email , , , , , , publications

Cross-talk between insulin like growth factor -1 and cell adhesion receptors in the regulation of cardiovascular diseases and complications associated with diabetes.

Cohen, Todd email , , , , publications

My research aims to uncover the molecular aspects of protein aggregation diseases (also called PAD) which include neurodegenerative diseases (such as Alzheimer’s disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), myofibrillar myopathies (such as muscular dystrophies), as well as the formation of age-related cataracts.  Although very distinct, these disorders share a common underlying pathogenic mechanism.  Using a combination of biochemistry and in vitro approaches, cell biology, and primary cells / transgenic mouse models, we will investigate the post-translational modifications (PTMs) that drive these disease processes. Ultimately, this research will provide a platform for future drug discovery efforts against these devastating diseases.

Coleman, William B. email , , , , , publications

The research in our laboratory involves several major projects related to the molecular pathogenesis of human cancer and investigations related to the biology of liver stem-like progenitor cells, including (i) characterization of human liver tumor suppressor genes, (ii) analysis of genetic determinants of breast cancer, (iii) investigation of mechanisms governing aberrant DNA methylation in breast cancer, (iv) liver progenitor cell responses after toxic liver injury, and (v) transplantation of liver stem-like progenitor cells for correction of genetic liver disease.

Collins, Edward email , , , , , publications

We study how Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL) are activated during infection and cancer.  Our long-term goal is to increase immunity in the case of infection or cancer and to decrease immunity in the case of autoimmunity.  The approaches that we use include x-ray crystallography and other biophysical techniques such as SPR and ITC, and immunological assays.  We are currently working on three systems.  1) basic immunology to understand how cytotoxic T cells are signaled to kill infected or cancer cells. 2) immunotherapy of melanoma using modified T cell receptors. 3) Determining why specific T cells populate pancreatic islets of Langerhans in Type I diabetes.  Students working on these projects could work on immunological or biophysical aspects (or both) depending on their interests.  Member of the Molecular & Cellular Biophysics Training Program.

Conlon, Frank email , , , , , publications

Our lab is studying the molecular mechanisms which are involved in the induction and proliferation and patterning of cardiac progenitor cell populations. To identify the molecular pathways involved in these processes, we have used Xenopus and mouse as model systems with particular focus on the endogenous role of genes implicated in the early steps of cardiogenesis and human congenital heart disease. Present projects in the lab involve embryological manipulations, tissue explant cultures, molecular screens as well as protein-DNA interaction experiments, biochemistry and promoter analysis.

Cook, Jeanette (Jean) email , , , , , , publications

The Cook lab studies the major transitions in the cell division cycle and how perturbations in cell cycle control affect genome stability. We have particular interest in mechanisms that control protein abundance and localization at transitions into and out of S phase (DNA replication phase) and into an out of quiescence. We use a variety of molecular biology, cell biology, biochemical, and genetic techniques to manipulate and evaluate human cells as they proliferate or exit the cell cycle. We collaborate with colleagues interested in the interface of cell cycle control with developmental biology, signal transduction, DNA damage responses, and oncogenesis.

Copenhaver, Gregory P. email , , , , , publications

The primary research area my lab is the regulation of meiotic recombination at the genomic level in higher eukaryotes.  Genomic instability and disease states, including cancer, can occur if the cell fails to properly regulate recombination.  We have created novel tools that give our lab an unparalleled ability to find mutants in genes that control recombination. We use a combination of genetics, bioinformatics, computational biology, cell biology and genomics in our investigations.  A second research area in the lab is the role of centromere DNA in chromosome biology.  We welcome undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and visiting scientists to join our team.

Costa, Daniel email , publications

Dr Costa’s primary research interests focus on the potential for air pollutants to adversely affect human health. By using animal models representing healthy and susceptible human populations (chronic heart and lung diseases), he has made major in-roads into understanding how contaminants in the air can cause illness and even death. He uses methods in cardiopulmonary and neuro-physiology coupled with modern cell-molecular biology to develop these models and to ascertain how health impairments influence responsiveness to pollutant stresses.

Costello, Joe email , , , , , publications

The main research project is to determine the role of intercellular junctions in normal development, cell aging and cataract formation in human and animal lenses.

Cotter, Peggy email , , , , publications

Dr. Cotter’s research is aimed at understanding molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis. Using Bordetella species as models, her group is studying the role of virulence gene regulation in respiratory pathogenesis, how virulence factors activate and suppress inflammation in the respiratory tract, and how proteins of the Two Partner Secretion pathway family are secreted to the bacterial surface and into the extracellular environment. A second major project is focused on Burkholderia pseudomallei, an emerging infectious disease and potential biothreat agent. This research is aimed at understanding the role of autotransporter proteins in the ability of this organism to cause disease via the respiratory route.

Cox, Adrienne email , , , , , publications

Our lab is interested in molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis, specifically as regulated by Ras and Rho family small GTPases. We are particularly interested in understanding how membrane targeting sequences of these proteins mediate both their subcellular localization and their interactions with regulators and effectors. Both Ras and Rho proteins are targeted to membranes by characteristic combinations of basic residues and lipids that may include the fatty acid palmitate as well as farnesyl and geranylgeranyl isoprenoids. The latter are targets for anticancer drugs; we are also investigating their unexpectedly complex mechanism of action. Finally, we are also studying how these small GTPases mediate cellular responses to ionizing radiation – how do cells choose whether to arrest, die or proliferate?

Crews, Fulton email , , , , , publications

Research in the laboratory focuses on mechanisms of neurodegeneration and regeneration, particularly stem cells in brain.

Crews, Stephen email , , , , , , publications

Research in the lab is focused on a genetic, cellular, and molecular understanding of Drosophila developmental neuroscience, including the following research areas – (1) Neuronal formation and differentiation, (2) Glial formation, migration, and axon-glial interactions, (3) Synaptic connectivity, and (4) Transcriptional regulation.

Crofton, Kevin email , , publications

Our laboratory has research interests that include developmental neurotoxicity, with an emphasis on the use of mode-of-action models to study the impact of endocrine disruptors and the cumulative risk of thyroid disruptors and pesticides.

Cyr, Douglas M. email , , , , publications

The Cyr laboratory studies cellular mechanisms for cystic fibrosis and prion disease.  We seek to determine how protein misfolding leads to the lung pathology associated with Cystic Fibrosis and the neurodegeneration associated with prion disease.

Damania, Blossom email , , , , , publications

The work in our laboratory is focused on understanding the molecular pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), an oncogenic human virus. KSHV is associated with several types of cancer in the human population. We study the effect of KSHV viral proteins on cell proliferation, transformation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and cell signal transduction pathways. We also study viral transcription factors, viral replication, and the interactions of KSHV with the human innate immune system. Additionally, we are developing drug therapies that curb viral replication and target tumor cells.

Dangl, Jeff email , , , , , , , publications

We use the premier model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, and real world plant pathogens like the bacteria Pseudomonas syringae and the oomycete Hyaloperonospora parasitica to understand the molecular nature of the plant immune system, the diversity of pathogen virulence systems, and the evolutionary mechanisms that influence plant-pathogen interactions. All of our study organisms are sequenced, making the tools of genomics accessible.

Darville, Lee Antoinette (Toni) email , , , , publications

Research in the Darville lab is focused on increasing our understanding of immune signaling pathways active in development of genital tract disease due to Chlamydia trachomatis and determination of chlamydial antigen-specific T cell responses that lead to protection from infection and disease. In vitro, murine model, and human studies are being performed with the ultimate goal to improve the sexual health of persons worldwide. Genetic and transcriptional microarray studies are being performed to explore pathogenic mechanisms and determine biomarkers of pelvic inflammatory disease due to Chlamydia as well as other sexually transmitted pathogens.

Davis, Ian email , , , , publications

With a particular interest in pediatric solid tumors, our lab aims to develop a mechanistic understanding of the role of aberrant or dysregulated transcription factors in oncogenesis.

de Silva, Aravinda email , , , , publications

We study Borrelia burgdorferi (the agent of Lyme disease) as a model for understanding arthropod vector-borne disease transmission. We also study the epidemiology and pathogenesis of dengue viruses associated with hemorrhagic disease.

Der, Channing email , , , , , , publications

Our research centers on understanding the molecular basis of human carcinogenesis. In particular, a major focus of our studies is the Ras oncogene and Ras-mediated signal transduction.  The goals of our studies include the delineation of the complex components of Ras signaling and the development of anti-Ras inhibitors for cancer treatment.  Another major focus of our studies involves our validation of the involvement of Ras-related small GTPases (e.g., Ral, Rho) in cancer.  We utilize a broad spectrum of technical approaches that include cell culture and mouse models, C. elegans, protein crystallography, microarray gene expression or proteomics analyses, and clinical trial analyses.

Deshmukh, Mohanish email , , , , , , publications

We study how mammalian cells regulate their survival and death (apoptosis).  We have focused our work on identifying unique mechanisms by which these pathways are regulated in neurons, stem cells, and cancer cells.  We utilize various techniques to examine this in primary cells as well as in transgenic and knock out mouse models in vivo.  Our ultimate goal is to discover novel cell survival and death mediators that can be targeted for therapy in neurodegeneration and cancer.

DeSimone, Joseph M. email , , , , publications

The direct fabrication and harvesting of monodisperse, shape-specific nano-biomaterials are presently being designed to reach new understandings and therapies in cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment.  Students interested in a rotation in the DeSimone group should not contact Dr. DeSimone directly.  Instead please contact Chris Luft at jluft@email.unc.edu.

Diatchenko, Luda email , , , , publications

The Diatchenko lab investigates the psychological, molecular, cellular, and genetic pathways that mediate both acute and persistent pain states.  Their primary goal is to identify the critical elements of human genetic variability contributing to pain sensitivity and pathophysiological pain states that will enable individualized treatments and therapies. Other related research endeavors include molecular hierarchy and evolution of functional SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms), regulation of gene expression underlying molecular pain signaling, development of surrogate animal models of human pain conditions, and clustering of neurological and psychological phenotypes that contribute to human persistent pain conditions. Answering these questions requires collaboration with experts in both clinical and basic biological sciences.  Such collaborative activities allow the Diatchenko group to take basic genetic findings all the way from human association studies, through molecular and cellular mechanisms, to animal models, and ultimately to human clinical trials.

Diaz-Sanchez, David email , , , , publications

The work focuses on how air pollutants affect human health, the role of genetics and epigenetic factors in determining susceptibility and clinical/dietary strategies to mitigate these effects. There is a strong emphasis on translational research projects using a multi-disciplinary approach. Thus, by using human in vivo models (such as clinical studies) we validate in vitro, epidemiology, and animal findings.

Dichter, Gabriel S email , publications

Dr. Dichter’s research examines pathophysiology and response to treatment in neurodevelopmental (autism, pediatric anxiety, and ADHD) and psychiatric (major depression) disorders using function MRI, eyetracking, electrophysiology, candidate molecular genetics, and phenotyping methods.  Lab facilities reside at the Duke-UNC Brain Imaging and Analysis Center, the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities, and the Duke Cognitive Behavioral and Research and Treatment Program.  Potential students should have a strong interest in clinical neuroscience and psychiatric research methods.

Dittmer, Dirk email , , , , , publications

Our lab tries to understand viral pathogenesis. To do so, we work with two very different viruses – West Nile Virus (WNV) and Kaposi¹s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8).

Doerschuk, Claire M email , , , , publications

We study host defense mechanisms in the lungs, particularly the inflammatory and innate immune processes important in the pathogenesis and course of bacterial pneumonia, acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome, and cigarette smoke-associated lung disease. Basic and translational studies address mechanisms of host defense, including recruitment and function of leukocytes, vascular permeability leading to edema, bacterial clearance and resolution.  Cell signaling pathways initiated by binding of leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion molecules and molecular mechanisms underlying the functions of neutrophils are two particular areas.

Dohlman, Henrik email , , , , , , publications

We use an integrated approach (genomics, proteomics, computational biology) to study the molecular mechanisms of hormone and drug desensitization. Our current focus is on RGS proteins (regulators of G protein signaling) and post-translational modifications including ubiquitination and phosphorylation.

Dokholyan, Nikolay email , , , , , publications

The mission of my laboratory is to develop and apply integrated computational and experimental strategies to understand, sense, and control misfolded proteins, and uncover the etiologies of human diseases. UNDERSTAND: We are working toward understanding of the protein misfolding diseases, such as Lou Gehrig’s disease and cystic fibrosis.. Other areas of interest include HIV, Graft versus Host disease (fatal autoimmune response to bone marrow transplant), and understanding and developing new drugs for pain. SENSE: We are working toward developing genetically-encoded proteins that bind and report rare/intermediate conformations of target molecules (proteins and RNA). CONTROL: We are working toward developing genetically-encoded proteins that control target proteins with light and/or drugs. We have developed novel approach for drug activation/deactivation of kinases, and light-activatable protein to manipulate protein function with light. We are working toward extending these approaches to other classes of proteins and on multiplexing, whereby we selectively activate/control several distinct cellular pathways via targeting several proteins simultaneously.

Dudek, Serena M email publications

Humans have a remarkable ability to learn from their environment after birth, but this plasticity also makes them susceptible to environmental insults.  At the cellular level, learning is accomplished by changing the strength of the synaptic connections between neurons.  Therefore, the Dudek lab is working to identify the underlying processes of synaptic plasticity.  Using molecular techniques, patch clamp recordings and confocal microscopic imaging from neurons in brain slices and culture, we ask how neuronal activity controls gene transcription and brain circuitry and what determines why some brain regions are more plastic than others.  These studies are likely to shed light on environmental causes of psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and autism.

Dudley, Andrew C email , , , , publications

Our lab is interested in the role of stromal cells (non tumor cells) during tumor growth; particularly, how inflammatory cells, endothelial cells and mesenchymal progenitor cells build new tumor blood vessels. We use tumor models to investigate i) the recruitment of stromal cells from nearby tissues and from the bone marrow during different stages of tumor progression ii) the abnormalities in these cells and iii) how tumors might “reprogram” the underlying stroma. For example, we have found that tumor-derived endothelium has properties of adult stem cells and can differentiate to form atypical tissues. Our goals are to identify the origin (s) of the endothelium in tumors, to understand how factors in the tumor microenvironment might reprogram cells within the stroma and how plasticity in the vasculature may lead to evasiveness to anti-angiogenic therapies.

Duncan, Alex email , , , , publications

My lab studies a recently identified pathogen-sensing signaling complex known as the inflammasome. The inflammasome is responsible for the proteolytic maturation of some cytokines and induces a novel necrotic cell death program. We have found that critical virulence factors from certain pathogens are able to activate NLRP3-mediated signaling, suggesting these pathogens may exploit this host signaling system in order to promote infections.  Our lab has active research projects in several areas relating to inflammasome signaling ranging from understanding basic molecular mechanisms of the pathway to studying the role of the system in animal models of infectious diseases.

Duronio, Bob email , , , , , publications

My lab studies how cell proliferation is controlled during animal development, with a focus on the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that regulate DNA replication and gene expression throughout the cell cycle. Many of the genes and signaling pathways that we study are frequently mutated in human cancers. Our current research efforts are divided into three areas:  1) Plasticity of cell cycle control during development  2) Histone mRNA biosynthesis and nuclear body function  3) Epigenetic control of genome replication and function

Earp, H. Shelton email , , , publications

Our lab is interested in how signals from membrane receptors are transduced to the nucleus altering gene expression, cell shape, proliferation and differentiation. We are particularly interested in tyrosine-specific protein kinases in breast and prostate cancer, as well as lymphoma/leukemia. Particular focus of the lab include the roles of :1) the EGF receptor family and related molecules e.g. HER4/ErbB4 in growth inhibition and differentiation, 2) the intracellular tyrosine kinase Ack which tyrosine phosphorylates the androgen receptor in androgen-independent prostate cancer and 3) a receptor tyrosine kinase that we cloned, Mer, that is expressed ectopically in childhood leukemias conferring a chemoresistant signal.  Mer also function in tumor-associated macrophages in a manner that appears to enhance tumor growth and immune system evasion.

Elston, Timothy email , , , , publications

The Elston lab is interested in understanding the dynamics of complex biological systems, and developing reliable mathematical models that capture the essential components of these systems. The projects in the lab encompass a wide variety of biological phenomena including signaling through MAPK pathways, noise in gene regulatory networks, airway surface volume regulation, and understanding energy transduction in motor proteins. A major focus of our research is understanding the role of molecular level noise in cellular and molecular processes. We have developed the software tool BioNetS to accurately and efficiently simulate stochastic models of biochemical networks

Emanuele, Michael email , , , , , publications

Our lab applies cutting edge genetic and proteomic technologies to unravel dynamic signaling networks involved in cell proliferation, genome stability and cancer. These powerful technologies are used to systematically interrogate the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), and allow us to gain a systems level understanding of the cell at unparalleled depth. We are focused on UPS signaling in cell cycle progression and genome stability, since these pathways are universally perturbed in cancer.

Erie, Dorothy email , , , , publications

The research in my lab is divided into two main areas – 1) Atomic force microscopy and fluorescence studies of protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, and 2) Mechanistic studies of transcription elongation. My research spans the biochemical, biophysical, and analytical regimes.

Errede, Beverly email , , , publications

Yeast molecular genetics; MAP-Kinease activation pathways; regulation of cell differentiation.

Everett, Eric T email , , , , , publications

Our research focuses upon craniofacial and mineralized tissue genetics; gene: environment interactions; mapping of complex traits; normal variation (to the extent that normal variation becomes abnormal); and animal models for oral/dental/craniofacial disorders.

Faber, James E. email , , , , publications

We study mechanisms of formation of the collateral circulation in embryonic and neonatal mice, 2) collateral growth and angiogenesis in models of ischemic disease in adult mice, 3) signaling in collateral endothelial cells, and 4) the genetic and environmental basis for the large variation in collateral vessel formation in the embryo and growth in ischemic disease (see Faber et al Physiol Genom 2007; Circ Res 2008) using genome-wide mapping and expression profiling (QTL, eQTL), consomic and haplotype analyses, plus physiologic, cellular and molecular study of candidate genes. Techniques in addition to those mentioned above include physiologic analysis of mouse models of cerebral, coronary and hindlimb ischemic disease, vascular imaging (angiography, laser Doppler flowmetry, micro-computed tomography), signaling analysis, cell and molecular biology.  We also study adaptive and pathological arterial wall growth and remodeling in the adult. The laboratory collaborates with other groups at UNC and other institutions in the US and elsewhere, providing varied opportunities for professional development.

Falk, Ronald J. email , , , publications

As the Director of the UNC Kidney Center, the scope of Dr. Falk’s research interests spans many disciplines, including molecular biology, immunology, genetics, pathology, cell biology, protein chemistry, epidemiology, pharmacokinetics and biostatistics. Dr. Falk is recognized world wide as a leader in research on kidney diseases related to autoimmune responses. He works closely with the basic research scientists within the UNC Kidney Center, including Dr. Gloria Preston, thus this research program provides an environment for Translational Research within the UNC Kidney Center.

Farraj, Aimen K email , , , , publications

Air pollution exposure is associated with increased hospital visits and mortality, and is a major area of research for the United States Environmental Protection Agency.  The primary research interest of my laboratory is the examination of the effects and mechanisms of air pollutants in the environment on normal cardiopulmonary function (cardiac toxicology), particularly in models of cardiovascular disease, using state-of-the-art targeted and high throughput methods. Research findings are often used to inform environmental public health and contribute to the refinement of the US EPA’s National Ambient Air Quality Standards for specific air pollutants set to limit their health impact.

Fenton, Suzanne E. email , , , publications

The Reproductive Endocrinology Group in the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Labs, led by Dr. Fenton, focuses on the role of environmental chemicals in breast developmental timing as it relates to puberty, increased susceptibility to form breast tumors, altered lactational ability, and the effects of chemicals on independent breast cancer risk factors such as obesity, breast density and pubertal timing. The projects within the lab often take a systems biology approach to the problem and instead of delving into exact mechanisms of an insult, which is in line with the missions of the NTP. The group also provides expertise in the use of whole mount mammary gland preparations in evaluating early life development of both male and female rat offspring and lifelong effects in female mice.

Fessler, Michael B. email , , , publications

Fessler laboratory investigates mechanisms of the innate immune response, in particular Toll like Receptor (TLR) pathways and how they regulate inflammatory and host defense responses in the lung.  To this end, we use both in vitro (macrophage cultures) and in vivo (mouse models of acute lung injury and pneumonia) model systems, and also use translational approaches (e.g., studies using human peripheral blood leukocytes and alveolar macrophages).  An area of particular interest within the laboratory is defining how cholesterol trafficking and dyslipidemia innate immunity.

Forest, Greg email , publications

Research interests include: transport processes in the lung, flow and structure of nano-materials & macromolecular fluids, weakly compressible transport phenomena, solitons and optical fiber applications, inverse problems for material characterization and modeling of transport in multiphase porous media.

Frazier-Bowers, Sylvia A. email , , , publications

My research interests include understanding the genetic basis of craniofacial anomalies relevant to the field of orthodontics.  Specifically, I investigate the genetic basis of dentofacial variation in a skeletal (mandibular prognathic) dentofacial phenotype (1-5% prevalence); tooth agenesis (congenitally missing teeth) and primary failure of eruption (a condition marked by the failure of teeth to erupt).  My current efforts focus on gene discovery and phenotype dissection of dentofacial variation using 1) 2 /3 dimensional methods for rigorous clinical characterization, 2) genotyping and linkage analysis and 3) mutational analysis using the candidate gene approach.

Frohlich, Flavio email , , , , , , publications

Our goal is to revolutionize the treatment of psychiatric and neurological illness by developing novel brain stimulation paradigms. We identify and target network dynamics of physiological and pathological brain function. We combine computational modeling, optogenetics, in vitro and in vivo electrophysiology in animal models and humans, control engineering, and clinical trials. We strive to make our laboratory a productive, collaborative, and happy workplace.

Fry, Rebecca email , , publications

The lab focuses on understanding how environmental exposures are associated with human disease with a particular focus on genomic and epigenomic perturbations. Using environmental toxicogenomics and systems biology approaches, we aim to identify key molecular pathways that associate environmental exposure with diseases. A current focus in the lab is to study prenatal exposure to various types of metals including arsenic, cadmium, and lead. We aim to understand molecular mechanisms by which such early exposures are associated with long-term health effects in humans. For example, we are examining DNA methylation (epigenetic) profiles in humans exposed to metals during the prenatal period. This research will enable the identification of gene and epigenetic biomarkers of metal exposure. The identified genes can serve as targets for study to unravel potential molecular bases for metal-induced disease. Ultimately, we aim to identify mechanisms of metal -induced disease and the basis for inter-individual disease susceptibility.

Frye, Stephen V. email , , , publications

As director of the Center for Integrative Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery at UNC, I play a key role in translational research through collaborative projects with other UNC faculty. Additionally, my Center has its own research focus in the area of chemical biology of chromatin regulation. I have a broad background in drug discovery and development having co-discovered a marketed product myself (Avodart) and created a department at GSK that discovered two FDA approved kinase inhibitor oncology therapies (Lapatinib and Pazopanib).

Furey, Terry email , , , , publications

My computational biology lab is highly collaborative focusing on (i) the study of gene regulation using genome-wide studies of chromatin structure in diverse human cells; and (ii) the investigation of molecular characteristics of cancer and other complex disease phenotypes through the integration of diverse genomic data including gene expression, DNA copy number, and genotype.  Much of these data we analyze result from experiments that employ high-throughput sequencing including DNase-seq, FAIRE-seq, ChIP-seq, and RNA-seq, and we are looking forward to incorporating whole genome sequence data as these become more readily available.

Garcia-Martinez, J. Victor email , , , , publications

Over millions of years of coexistence humans and pathogens have develop intricate and very intimate relationships.  These highly specialized interactions are the basic determinants of pathogenesis and disease progression.  Our laboratory is interested in elucidating the molecular basis of disease.  Our multidisciplinary approach to molecular medicine is based on our interest in the translation of basic research observations into clinical implementation.  For this purpose we use a variety of in vitro and in vivo approaches to study AIDS, Cancer, immunological diseases, gene therapy, etc.  Of particular interest is the use of state of the art models such as humanized mice to study human specific pathogens like HIV, EBV, Kaposiâ’s sarcoma, influenza, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus.  In addition, we are interested in the development and implementation of novel approaches to prevent viral transmission using pre-expossure prophylaxis and vaccines.

Gershon, Timothy R email , , , publications

As a pediatric neurologist and brain tumor researcher, I seek to understand the link between brain growth and childhood brain tumors.  During postnatal cerebellar development, neural progenitors divide rapidly.  This wave of neurogenesis must be strictly controlled to prevent formation of medulloblastoma, a malignant neuroblastic tumor of the cerebellum.  Using transgenic mice that express constitutively active Smoothened, we are able to recapitulate tumorigenesis in mice.  These tumor-prone mice develop medulloblastomas that model the human tumor in pathology and gene expression.  We use this primary brain tumor model to gain novel insight into medulloblastoma pathogenesis and treatment.

Gilmore, John email , , , , publications

Dr. Gilmore’s research group is applying state-of–the-art magnetic resonance imaging and image analysis techniques to study human brain development in 0-6 year olds.  Approaches include structural, diffusion tensor, and resting state functional imaging, with a focus on cortical gray and white matter development and its relationship to cognitive development.  Studies include normally developing children, twins, and children at high risk for schizophrenia and bipolar illness.  We also study the contributions of genetic and environmental risk factors to early brain development in humans.  A developing collaborative project with Flavio Frohlich, PhD will use imaging to study white and gray matter development in ferrets and its relationship with cortical oscillatory network development.

Gilmour, M Ian email , , , , publications

Dr M Ian Gilmour is a Principal Investigator at the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL), U.S Environmental Protection Agency in RTP.    He received an Honors degree in microbiology from the University of Glasgow, and a doctorate in aerosol science and mucosal immunology from the University of Bristol in 1988.  After post-doctoral work at the John Hopkins School of Public Health and the U.S. EPA, he became a Research Associate in the Center for Environmental Medicine at the University of North Carolina. In 1998 he joined the EPA fellowship program and in 2000 became a permanent staff member.  He holds adjunct faculty positions with the UNC School of Public Health and the Curriculum in Toxicology, and at NC State Veterinary School.  He has published over 80 research articles in the field of pulmonary immunobiology where his research focuses on the interaction between air pollutant exposure and the development of infectious and allergic lung disease.

Giovanello, Kelly S email , publications

My research combines behavioral, patient-based, and functional neuroimaging approaches to investigate the cognitive neuroscience of human learning and memory. My primary research focus is in elucidating the cognitive processes and neural mechanisms mediating relational memory – the form of memory which represents relationships among items or informational elements. In everyday life, relational memory processes play a critical role in linking or binding together the various cognitive, affective, and contextual components of a learning event into an integrated memory trace. I am interested in exploring the cognitive and neural processes mediating relational memory in young adults and examining how these processes change with healthy aging and neurodegenerative disease (particularly Alzheimer’s disease).

Girdler, Susan email , , , publications

I have been an NIH-funded women’s health researcher for over 20 years.   The focus of my current research is in reproductive mood disorders, such as premenstrual dysphoric disorder and postpartum depression.  Current research in my lab is investigating the role of psychosocial stress (e.g., histories of trauma) and alterations in cardiovascular, neuroendocrine, and GABAergic neurosteroid reactivity to stress in reproductive mood disorders.   I also have a long-standing research record in studies investigating ethnic and racial differences in physiologic stress reactivity and endogenous pain regulation.    /  / I co-direct an NIH-funded postdoctoral training program as well as the UNC Department of Psychiatry Junior Faculty Mentoring Program.  I am dedicated to training the next generation of independent investigators.

Goldman, William email , , , , publications

Successful respiratory pathogens must be able to respond swiftly to a wide array of sophisticated defense mechanisms in the mammalian lung.  In histoplasmosis, macrophages — a first line of defense in the lower respiratory tract — are effectively parasitized by Histoplasma capsulatum.  We are studying this process by focusing on virulence factors produced as this “dimorphic” fungus undergoes a temperature-triggered conversion from a saprophytic mold form to a parasitic yeast form.  Yersinia pestis also displays two temperature-regulated lifestyles, depending on whether it is colonizing a flea or mammalian host.  Inhalation by humans leads to a rapid and overwhelming disease, and we are trying to understand the development of pneumonic plague by studying genes that are activated during the stages of pulmonary colonization.

Goldstein, Bob email , , , , , , publications

We address fundamental issues in cell and developmental biology, issues such as how cells move to specific positions, how the orientations of cell divisions are determined, how the mitotic spindle is positioned in cells, and how cells respond to cell signaling – for example Wnt signaling, which is important in development and in cancer biology. We are committed to applying whatever methods are required to answer important questions. As a result, we use diverse methods, including methods of cell biology, developmental biology, forward and reverse genetics including RNAi, biochemistry, biophysics, mathematical and computational modeling and simulations, molecular biology, and live microscopy of cells and of the dynamic components of the cytoskeleton – microfilaments, microtubules, and motor proteins. Most experiments in the lab use C. elegans embryos, and we have also used Drosophila and Xenopus recently. C. elegans is valuable as a model system because of the possibility of combining the diverse techniques above to answer a wide array of interesting questions. We also have a project underway to develop a new model system for studying how cellular and developmental mechanisms evolve, using little-studied organisms called water bears. Rotating graduate students learn to master existing techniques, and students who join the lab typically grow their rotation projects into larger, long term projects, and/or develop creative, new projects.

Gomez, Shawn email , , , , publications

Our primary research is in the area of computational systems biology, with particular interest in the study of biological signaling networks; trying to understand their structure, evolution and dynamics. In collaboration with wet lab experimentalists, we develop and apply computational models, including probabilistic graphical and multivariate methods along with more traditional engineering approaches such as system identification and control theory, to current challenges in molecular biology and medicine. Examples of recent research projects include: prediction of protein interaction networks, multivariate modeling of signal transduction networks, and development of methods for integrating large-scale genomic data sets.

Goonetilleke, Nilu email , , publications

We are a human immunology lab focusing on all aspects of T cell immunobiology in HIV-1 infection. Studies range from basic questions like, ‘What are the determinants of the first T cell response following infection?’ to translational challenges such as ‘What is the best design for a T cell vaccine to either prevent infection or achieve HIV-1 cure?’

Keywords: T cells, HIV-1, Escape, CD8 T cells, Vaccines, Cure, Vaccines

Grant, Sarah email , , , , , publications

Our research goal is to understand how bacterial pathogens cause disease on their hosts. We are working with a plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae which introduces virulence proteins into host cells to suppress immune responses. Our laboratory collaborates with Jeff Dangl’s lab in the UNC Biology Department using genomics approaches to identify P. syringae virulence proteins and to discover how they alter plant cell biology to evade the plant immune system and cause disease.

Graves, Lee M. email , , , , publications

Our lab is studying the role of mitogen and stress-activated protein kinases to regulate key aspects of cell metabolism. We are also studying signalling by tyrosine kinases in response to toxicological agents or cell stress.

Griffith, Jack email , , , , , , publications

We are interested in basic DNA-protein interactions as related to – DNA replication, DNA repair and telomere function.  We utilize a combination of state of the art molecular and biochemical methods together with high resolution electron microscopes.

Gupton, Stephanie email , , , , , , , publications

During cell shape change and motility, a dynamic cytoskeleton produces the force to initiate plasma membrane protrusion, while vesicle trafficking supplies phospholipids and membrane proteins to the expanding plasma membrane. Extracellular cues activate intracellular signaling pathways to elicit specific cell shape changes and motility responses through coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics and vesicle trafficking. In my lab we are investigating the role of two ubiquitin ligases, TRIM9 and TRIM67, in the cell shape changes that occur during neuronal development. We utilize a variety techniques including high resolution live cell microscopy, gene disruption, mouse models, and biochemistry to understand the complex coordination of cytoskeletal dynamics and membrane trafficking driving neuronal shape change and growth cone motility in primary neurons.

Hahn, Klaus email , , , , , , , , publications

Dynamic control of signaling networks in living cells; Rho family and MAPK networks in motility and network plasticity; new tools to study protein activity in living cells (i.e., biosensors, protein photomanipulation, microscopy). Member of the Molecular & Cellular Biophysics Training Program and the Medicinal Chemistry Program.

Hammond, Scott email , , , , , publications

My lab studies a gene silencing phenomenon called RNA interference, or RNAi.  We are interested in the role of RNAi in regulating endogenous genes, particularly those involved in cancer progression pathways.

Hansen, Jonathan email , , , publications

Current research indicates that inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD’s), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, are due to uncontrolled innate and adaptive immune responses to commensal (non-pathogenic) intestinal bacteria in genetically susceptible hosts.  However, the roles of intestinal bacteria in the perpetuation and progression of IBD’s are unclear and the effects of intestinal inflammation on commensal bacterial physiology and virulence are unknown.  We hypothesize that commensal bacteria dynamically respond to intestinal inflammation in a manner that perpetuates or worsens disease.  Exploring this hypothesis will enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of IBD’s and host-microbial interactions, and potentially identify new therapeutic targets for these currently incurable diseases.

Harden, Kendall email , , , , , publications

We focus on mechanistic/structural aspects of regulatory proteins (heterotrimeric and Ras family GTPases, RGS proteins, and PLC isozymes) involved in inositol lipid signaling, and on G protein-coupled receptors for extracellular nucleotides.

Harry, G. Jean email , , , publications

The Neurotoxicology Group examines the role of microglia interactions with neurons and the associated immune-mediated responses in brain development and aging as they relate to the initiation of brain damage, the progression of cell death, and subsequent repair/regenerative capabilities.  We have an interest in the neuroimmune response with regards to neurodegenerative diseases such as, Alzheimer’s disease.

Hathaway, Nathaniel A. email , , , , , publications

The Hathaway lab is focused on understanding the biological events responsible for dynamically regulating the selective expression of the mammalian genome. In multicellular organisms, genes must be regulated with high precision during stem cell differentiation to achieve normal development. Pathologically, the loss of proper gene regulation caused by defects in chromatin regulatory enzymes has been found to be a driving force in cancer initiation and progression. My lab uses a combination of chemical biology and cell biology approaches to unravel the molecular mechanisms that govern gene expression. We utilize new tools wielding an unprecedented level of temporal control to visualize changes in chromatin structure and function in mammalian cells and animal models. In addition, we seek to identify small molecule inhibitors that are selective for chromatin regulatory enzymes with the potential for future human therapeutics.

Hayes, David N email , , , publications

Molecular carcinogenesis, research translation, biomarkers, computational toxicology

Hazari, Mehdi S email , , , publications

My research interests include studying the effects of air toxicants on the central and local neural controls of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, and mechanisms of autonomic dysfunction that render a host susceptible to adverse health events. The most recent efforts focus on physiological measures of toxicity and susceptibility; in particular, we are examining the role of TRPA1, which is a general irritant (pain) sensor, in toxicant-induced cardiovascular effects. The long-term goals of my lab are to address questions of toxicology, especially those relating to air pollution and climate change, from a broader public health perspective.

Hedrick, Tyson email , , publications

Research in my laboratory focuses on how animals produce and control movement, with a particular interest in animal flight.  We use both computational and experimental techniques to examine how organismal components such as the neuromuscular and neurosensory systems interact with the external environment via mechanics and aerodynamics to produce movement that is both accurate and robust.  Keywords: biomechanics, flight, avian, insect, neural control, muscle, locomotion, computational modeling

Heise, Mark email , , , , , publications

We study alphavirus infection to model virus-induced disease.  Projects include 1) mapping viral determinants involved in encephalitis, and 2) using a mouse model of virus-induced arthritis to identify viral and host factors associated with disease.

Hemminger, Brad email publications

bioinformatics, scholarly communications, digital libraries, user interface design, annotation, virtual environments, medical informatics, databases and datamining.

Henning, Susan J email , , publications

Intestinal stem cells (ISC) are central to the biology of the intestinal epithelium (which is the most rapidly proliferating tissue in the human body) and may have significant therapeutic potential for repair of intestinal damage. We have developed novel methods to isolate ISC. Current projects include: a.) refinement of these methods to get purer preparations; and b.) development of protocols in vitro expansion of ISC and their in vivo transplantation. Thus, our lab offers both basic science and translational research opportunities.

Hicks, Leslie M. email , , , , publications

Research in the Hicks lab focuses on development and implementation of mass spectrometric approaches for protein characterization including post-translational modifications, as well as the identification of bioactive peptides/proteins from plants. Keywords: proteins / peptides, proteomics, PTM, enzymes, analytical chemistry, mass spectrometry, separations / chromatography, plants, algae

Hirsch, Matthew email , , , , publications

Our lab works with adeno-associated viral vectors for both the characterization of vector and host responses upon transduction and as therapeutic agents for the treatment of genetic diseases.  In particular, we tend to focus on the 145 nucleotide viral inverted terminal repeats of the transgenic genome and their multiple functions including the replication initiation, inherent promoter activity, and stimulation of intra/inter molecular DNA repair pathways.  The modification of the AAV ITRs by synthetic sequences imparts unique functions/activities rendering these synthetic vectors perhaps better suited for therapeutic applications.

Hodge, Clyde email , , , , , publications

The primary goal of our research is to elucidate the neurobiological systems that mediate the behavioral effects of alcohol and drugs of abuse.

Homeister, Jonathon W. email , , , , publications

Our research focuses on understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of leukocyte (white blood cell) trafficking and homing in vascular inflammation and immune responses. We are interested in the glycobiology of the Selectin leukocyte adhesion molecules and their ligands, and understanding the roles for these glycoproteins in the pathogenesis of inflammatory/immune cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and vasculitis. We are also interested in the mechanisms whereby the selectins and their ligands link the inflammatory response and coagulation cascade and thereby modulate thrombosis and hemostasis.

Hopfinger, Joseph email , publications

Research in my laboratory investigates human cognition. We use behavioral measures and scalp-recorded event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to gain a better understanding of the rapid neural dynamics underlying cognitive processes, such as the interactions between attentional capture, sustained attention, and distraction.  We also use fMRI to investigate the neural architecture supporting voluntary attention, as well as social cognitive processes.  A new direction of our research is using these methods to investigate changes in neural connectivity that may be associated with cognitive “brain training.” Finally, in collaborative projects, we also investigate social cognitive processing in psychiatric populations, language comprehension in healthy individuals, and dysfunctional attentional control in adults at risk for alcoholism.

Huang, David email , , publications

Dr. David Huang is the director of the UNC Health Care Comprehensive Stroke Center and  the director of the UNC Stroke Trials Unit (STU).  He has research interests in developing new treatments for ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes .  The STU conducts a number of clinical trials testing novel treatments as well as studies investigating the pathophysiology of cellular injury resulting from stroke.

Huang, Leaf email , , publications

Dr. Huang is a pioneer in nanoparticle vectors for delivery of drugs, genes and vaccines. He has designed a core/membrane type nanoparticle which evades the macrophages in the liver and the spleen and deliver a large fraction of the injected dose to the target cells. The nanomedicine can encapsulate siRNA, peptide or chemotherapy drugs, either alone or in combination, resulting in effective inhibition of tumor growth. The Huang lab is also interested in designing peptide or mRNA vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. He uses nanoparticles as a tool to study the cross talks between cells in the tumor microenvironment.

Hunter, E. Sidney email , , publications

Our research focuses on determining the mechanisms responsible for craniofacial birth defects. We use the whole embryo culture system to expose mouse conceptuses to toxicants and evaluate morphological, molecular (Affy arrays) and protein changes. Antisense morpholinos and adenoviruses are used to modulate gene expression and determine phenotypic effects.  We are using embryonic stem cells as a model to evaluate the effects of environmental chemicals on differentiation. Using molecular markers to identify differentiation may provide critical information to identify developmental toxicants.

Hursting, Stephen D email , , , , publications

Dr. Hursting’s lab focuses on the molecular and metabolic mechanisms underlying nutrition and  cancer associations, particularly the impact of obesity and energy balance modulation (eg, calorie restriction, exercise) on cancer development or responses to chemotherapy. Primarily using genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic, colon and breast cancer, Dr. Hursting has identified the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR and NF-kB signaling pathways as key targets for breaking the obesity- cancer link.  He has also established in several preclinical models of pancreatic and breast cancer that obesity impacts the response to various forms of chemotherapy.  In addition, the Hursting lab is involved in several translational research collaborations linking mouse model studies with clinical trials, and his group has expertise in measuring metabolic hormones, growth factors, inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in serum and tissue from rodents and humans.

Ibrahim, Joseph G email , , , publications

My research involves developing statistical methods in computational biology, including  methods Chip-seq data as well as the development of statistical methods for gene expression and sequence data.

Ideraabdullah, Folami Y email , , , , publications

The lab focus is to understand the mechanism of gene-environment interactions by examining the genetic basis of epigenetic response to nutrition and environmental toxicants. The long-term goal is to identify and characterize genetic (naturally occurring and induced) and environmental (toxicant and nutritional) causes of disruption of DNA methylation patterns during development and to determine their role in disease. The primary focus is on DNA methylation patterns during germ cell and early embryonic development during critical windows of epigenetic reprogramming.

Jacobson, Ken email , , , publications

Structure, dynamics and function of viral domains in biomembranes.  Photomanipulation and traction mapping applied to the migration of single cells. Investigation of the mechanochemical basis of cell oscillations using systems biology approaches coupled with experiments.

Jarstfer, Michael email , , , , publications

The Jarstfer lab uses an interdisciplinary approach to solve biological problems that are germane to human health.   Currently we are investigating the structure of the enzyme telomerase, we are developing small-molecules that target the telomere for drug discovery and chemical biology purposes, and we are investigating the signals that communicate the telomere state to the cell in order to control cellular immortality. We are also engaged in a drug/chemical tool discovery project to identify small molecules that control complex social behavior in mammals.  Techniques include standard molecular biology and biochemistry of DNA, RNA, and proteins, occasional organic synthesis, and high throughput screening.

Jaspers, Ilona email , , , , , publications

Research in my lab focuses on the mechanisms by which exposure to air pollutants alters respiratory immune responses and modifies susceptibility to and the severity of respiratory virus infections. Specifically, we are examining the effects of air pollutants such as ozone, woodsmoke and tobacco product exposures on host defense responses and influenza virus infections, using several in vitro models of the respiratory epithelium. In collaboration with physician scientists, we are also translating these studies into humans in vivo.

Jay, Michael email , publications

My research projects are at the interface between the pharmaceutical and nuclear sciences.  They involve the application of pharmaceutical approaches to solve problems related to nuclear imaging and therapy, and the use of radioanalytical approaches to solve problems encountered in the development of novel formulations and drug delivery systems.  I am currently developing orally bioavailable prodrugs of DTPA as radionuclide decorporation agents that can be added to the National Stockpile for use following a nuclear terrorism event or accident.   In addition, I am neutron activated to produce radiotherapeutic microneedles and nanoparticles using novel matrices. As with most of my colleagues in the Pharmaceutical Sciences Graduate Program, my Ph.D. students find rewarding employment upon graduation.  My academic offspring currently hold senior positions in the pharmaceutical industry and lead research centers in prestigious academic institutions.

Jennette, Charles J. email , , publications

My research interests and diagnostic responsibilities center around nephropathology and immunopathology. My laboratory carries out basic, translational and clinicopathologic research on kidney diseases. I am most interested in pathogenic mechanisms and pathologic manifestations of glomerular diseases and vasculitis. A major current research focus is on elucidating the pathogenesis of vascular inflammation caused by anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA).

Jin, Jian email , publications

Research in the Jian Jin lab focuses on the following two main areas: (1) discovering chemical probes for histone methyltransferases (HMTs), a class of more than 50 epigenetic writers that play a critical role in diverse biological processes including chromatin compaction, gene expression, transcriptional regulation, and cell differentiation; and (2) creating functionally selective ligands of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for treating various central nervous system (CNS) disorders.

Johns, Josephine email , , , , publications

Effects of drugs of abuse on maternal behavior and aggression and the effects of prenatal exposure to drugs on offspring development and behavior.  Approaches range from molecular to behavioral as our work is basic science with a clinically applicable focus.

Johnson, Gary L. email , , , , publications

Spatio-temporal regulation of signal relay systems in cells using live cell fluorescence imaging and targeted gene disruption of signaling proteins to define their role in development, physiology and pathophysiology.

Jones, Alan email , , , , , , publications

The Jones lab is interested in heterotrimeric G protein-coupled signaling and uses genetic model systems to dissect signaling networks.  The G-protein complex serves as the nexus between cell surface receptors and various downstream enzymes that ultimately alter cell behavior. Metazoans have a hopelessly complex repertoire of G-protein complexes and cell surface receptors so we turned to the reference plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as our models because these two organisms have only two potential G protein complexes and few cell surface receptors.  Their simplicity and the ability to genetically manipulate genes in these organisms make them powerful tools.  We use a variety of cell biology approaches, sophisticated imaging techniques, 3-D protein structure analyses, forward and reverse genetic approaches, and biochemistries.

Jones, Corbin email , , , , , , publications

The goal of my research is to identify, clone, and characterize the evolution of genes underlying natural adaptations in order to determine the types of genes involved, how many and what types of genetic changes occurred, and the evolutionary history of these changes. Specific areas of research include: 1) Genetic analyses of adaptations and interspecific differences in Drosophila, 2) Molecular evolution and population genetics of new genes and 3) Evolutionary analysis of QTL and genomic data.

Juliano, Jonathan email , , , , publications

Despite recent success in reducing malaria transmission, the estimated annual numbers of malaria infections (~225 million) and deaths (~781,000) remain high. Despite this immense burden, our understanding of the genetic diversity of malaria and the factors that promote this diversity is limited.  This diversity among plasmodial parasites has a critical impact on many factors involved in the control of infections, including: 1) development of drug resistance, 2) development of naturally acquired immunity, and 3) vaccine design.  My laboratory’s primary interests are: 1) describing the genetic diversity of P. falciparum using molecular biological and next generation sequencing tools, and 2) using these data to understand the evolutionary and ecological factors that drive this diversity, promote the emergence of drug resistance and affect our ability to effectively develop immunity.

Kabanov, Alexander (Sasha) email , , publications

In our lab we develop novel polymer based drug delivery systems and nanomedicines incorporating small molecules, DNA and polyptides to treat cancer, neurodegenerative and other CNS-related disorders.

Kafri, Tal email , , , , publications

Our lab is focused on the development of HIV-1 vectors for gene therapy of genetic disease.  In addition, we are using the vector system to study HIV-1 biology.  We are also interested in utilizing the HIV-1 vector system for functional genomics.

Kakoki, Masao email , publications

My research aims at prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases and focuses on the identification of genes that confer susceptibility or resistance to the diseases with the use of genetically engineered mice. In collaboration with Dr.Oliver Smithies, I very recently developed a new method for altering gene expression by modifying 3’ untranslated regions in mice which enables fine-tuned modification of gene expression. I am now analyzing the phenotypes of several mouse models generated with this method.

Kash, Thomas email , , , , , publications

Emotional behavior is regulated by a host of chemicals, including neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, acting on specific circuits within the brain. There is strong evidence for the existence of both endogenous stress and anti-stress systems. Chronic exposure to drugs of abuse and stress are hypothesized to modulate the relative balance of activity of these systems within key circuitry in the brain leading to dysregulated emotional behavior. One of the primary focuses of the Kash lab is to understand how chronic drugs of abuse and stress alter neuronal function, focusing on these stress and anti-stress systems in brain circuitry important for anxiety-like behavior. In particular, we are interested in defining alterations in synaptic function, modulation and plasticity using a combination of whole-cell patch-clamp physiology, biochemistry and mouse models.  Current projects are focused on the role of a unique population of dopamine neurons in alcoholism and anxiety.

Kaufman, David G. email , , , , , publications

Topic 1  We seek genomic targets for carcinogenesis among segments of DNA replicated in early S phase when cells are most susceptible to carcinogens.  We are mapping genomic sites replicated during early S phase, identifying origins of replication activated in this interval, and characterizing temporal sequencing of replication from these origins.  Topic 2  We are reconstructing differentiated and functional human endometrial tissue from epithelial and stromal cells interacting in culture.  We use these co-cultures to study development of endometrial cancer.

Kawula, Tom email , , , , , publications

Our research focuses on elucidating pathogenic mechanisms of the Gram negative bacterial pathogens Francisella tularensis and Haemophilus ducreyi. Specific attention is given to mechanisms that engage the host and subvert host innate and adaptive immune responses. To achieve these goals the lab develops and adapts genetic systems to manipulate the bacteria and to identify and analyze the contributions of specific genetic loci to the infectious process. Models that recapitulate naturally occurring disease are developed and used to study in-depth the intricacies of host pathogen interactions that define the mechanisms behind bacterial virulence, adaptation and the host response.

Ke, Hengming email , , , , publications

Our research focuses on the structure and function of medically important proteins from the crystallographic approach.  The current topics include cycolphilin, calcineurin, heat shock protein 90 (hsp90), and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

Kelada, Samir email , , , , , publications

While both genes and environment are thought to influence human health, most investigations of complex disease only examine one of these risk factors in isolation.  Accounting for both types of risk factors and their complex interactions allows for a more holistic view of complex disease causation.  The Kelada lab is focused on the identification and characterization of these gene-environment interactions in airway diseases, particularly asthma, a disorder of major public health importance.   /  / Additionally, to gain insight into how the airway responds to relevant exposures (e.g., allergens or pathogens), we study gene expression in the lung (particularly airway epithelia). Our goal is identify the genetic determinants of gene expression by measuring gene expression across many individuals (genotypes). / This “systems genetics” approach allows us to identify master regulators of gene expression that may underlie disease susceptibility or represent novel therapeutic targets. /

Kesimer, Mehmet email , , , , publications

The upper airways serve to clean inspired air from physical, chemical and pathological detritus that might damage the delicate peripheral airways where oxygen exchange is achieved. It is the heart of a powerful two tiered  innate immune system based upon a  layer of mucus that captures the incoming material that is moved over a bed of cilia. The system is called the muco-ciliary escalator.
Failure of this complex protective system is associated with a wide variety of diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammatory diseases. Biomolecules in mucus are split into two distinct groups, the first group being of globular type proteins between 6 kDa to 200 kDa and the second being of mucins which are large, space-filling glycoconjugates of 200 kDa to 100 MDa, with most of this mass being of carbohydrate in origin. Besides these biomolecules, mucus also contains secreted vesicles (exosomes) with innate immune properties. In chronic inflammatory lung diseases like cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic bronchitis (COPD) and asthma, mucus quantity and quality is altered and it is not efficiently removed from the lungs, causing airway obstruction, impaired gas exchange, bacterial colonization & infection and damage to lung tissue. The long term goal of our laboratory is to understand how this innate immune barrier is dynamically organized around the protective macromolecules under normal and pathological conditions. Currently, research in the Kesimer laboratory is focused on three main fundamentally important areas: 1- How mucins and globular proteins are organized within the airway mucosal barrier and how they are altered in disease pathogenesis, 2- How mucins are processed to mature after granular release for optimal function and how this progression is altered in chronic lung diseases, CF in particular, and 3- The role of extracellular vesicles in the airway mucosal barrier. Our laboratory is established with a wide range of state of the art biochemical, biophysical and proteomics methods including UPLC-Orbitrap mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy, dynamic and static light scattering, and a variety of surface biophysics tools including QCM-D.

Khan, Asma email publications

My primary area of research is orofacial pain and includes studies on the role of the role of micro-RNA in the pathogenesis pain  as well as outcome studies on the management of orofacial pain. I am also involved in multi center clinical trials on regeneration of the pulp-dentin complex.

Kieber, Joe email , , , , , publications

Hormones influence virtually every aspect of plant growth and development. My lab is examining the molecular mechanisms controlling the biosynthesis and signal transduction of the phytohormones cytokinin and ethylene, and the roles that these hormones play in various aspects of development. We employ genetic, molecular, biochemical, and genomic approaches using the model species Arabidopsis to elucidate these pathways.

Kier, William email , , , publications

I am interested in the comparative biomechanics of marine invertebrates.  In particular, I study the functional morphology of musculoskeletal systems, the structure, function, development and evolution of muscle, and invertebrate zoology, with particular emphasis on the biology of cephalopod molluscs (octopus and squid).  My research is conducted at a variety of levels and integrates the range from the behavior of the entire animal to the ultrastructure and biochemistry of its tissues.

Kim, WIlliam Y email , , , , publications

Our research explores the role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) in tumorigenesis. HIF is a transcription factor that plays a key role in oxygen sensing, the adaptation to hypoxia and the tumor microenvironment. It is expressed in the majority of solid tumors and correlates with poor clinical outcome. Therefore, HIF is a likely promoter of solid tumor growth and angiogenesis.  Our lab uses mouse models to ask if and how HIF cooperates with other oncogenic events in cancer.  We are currently investigating HIF’s role in the upregulation of circulating tumor cells and circulating endothelial cells.

Kleeberger, Steven email , , , , publications

Genetic determinants of environmental lung diseases.

Knickmeyer Santelli, Rebecca email , , , , publications

Dr. Knickmeyer Santelli’s lab seeks to advance our understanding of neurodevelopmental disorders through the integration of pediatric neuroimaging with genetic, endocrine, and behavioral methodologies. In particular, her research explores the role which common and rare genetic variation plays in explaining individual differences in neurodevelopment during infancy and early childhood and investigates the mechanisms which modulate differential vulnerability to and expression of neurodevelopment disorders in each sex. She is also using MRI to evaluate the effects of prenatal exposure to antidepressants and to understand how microbial colonization of the gut impacts human brain development and anxiety.

Ko, Ching-Chang email , , , , publications

Ko’s laboratory has focused on bone regeneration using biomaterials and biomechanical approaches. The on-going project is to develop a new synthetic process for biomimetic bone nanocomposites. The new biomaterial and its scaffolds are under development for stem cell-mediated bone regeneration. Biomechanical principles that regulate mineral crystallization are incorporated with the biomaterial approach to translate research outcomes to clinical usage (e.g., immediately loaded dental implants). My lab is also interested in understanding reverse engineering principles of bio-mienralization.

Kodavanti, Urmila P email , , , , publications

Our research focuses on understanding mechanisms of cardiovascular and metabolic health effects of inhaled air pollutants. Specific emphasis is given to susceptibility variations due to underlying cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes. The roles of genetic versus physiological factors are examined. We use molecular and high throughput genomics, and proteomics techniques to establish a link with disease phenotype and physiological alterations. State-of-the-art EPA inhalation facilities are used for air pollution exposures in animal models with or without genetic predisposition. The role of environment in disease burden is the focus.

Koller, Beverly email , publications

We have used gene targeting to generate an animal model for the most common genetic disease in the Caucasian population, cystic fibrosis. We are continuing to characterize this animal and to modify it to produce a disease that more closely resembles human cystic fibrosis. A second area in which our lab is interested involves the study of the inflammatory processes involved in allergic responses, asthma, and arthritis. Our current efforts are aimed at generating animals deficient in various factors that are believed to be important in these diseases. By providing us with a better understanding of the immunological processes that underlie allergic responses, asthma and arthritis, these animals should help us to identify more effective treatments for these diseases.

Krupenko, Natalia email , , , , , publications

My laboratory is interested in the role of folate and related metabolic pathways in methyl group metabolism, and their involvement in pathogenesis and etiology of diseases. We have recently discovered a novel function of a folate-binding methyltransferase GNMT in the regulation of cellular proliferation, and now study the genetic variations in GNMT and their effects on new function. Our lab is also interested in the cross talk between folate metabolism and sphingolipid pathways as a mediator of folate stress with the goal of exploiting this connection to improve human health.

Krupenko, Sergey email , , , , publications

Dr. Krupenko’s research is focused on the role of folate metabolism in cellular homeostasis and cancer disease. He is especially interested in the function of a major folate enzyme and a putative tumor suppressor ALDH1L1 as metabolic regulator and a guardian of non-malignant phenotype. At present he studies function of this enzyme and related proteins using mouse knockout models. Recently his research team has also demonstrated that dietary folate regulates cancer metastasis. He now pursues studies of specific signaling pathways involved in metastatic response to dietary folate status.

Kuhlman, Brian email , , , , publications

We use a combination of experimental and computational methods to redesign protein-protein interactions.  The potential applications for this technology include enhancing protein therapeutic and creating new tools to study signaling pathways.

Laederach, Alain email , , , , , publications

The Laederach Lab is interested in better understanding the relationship between RNA structure and folding and human disease. We use a combination of computational and experimental approaches to study the process of RNA folding and in the cells. In particular, we develop novel approaches to analyze and interpret chemical and enzymatic mapping data on a genomic scale. We aim to fundamentally understand the role of RNA structure in controlling post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, and to interpret structure as a secondary layer of information (http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v505/n7485/full/505621a.html).  We are particularly interested in how human genetic variation affects RNA regulatory structure. We investigate the relationship between disease-associated Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms occurring in Human UTRs and their effect on RNA structure to determine if they form a RiboSNitch.

Lai, Samuel email , , , , , , , publications

Our dynamic group are broadly involve in three topics: (i) prevention of infectious diseases by harnessing interactions between secreted antibodies and mucus, (ii) immune response to biomaterials, and (iii) targeted delivery of nanomedicine.  Our group was the first to discover that secreted antibodies can interact with mucins to trap pathogens in mucus.  We are now harnessing this approach to engineer improved passive and active immuniation (i.e. vaccines) at mucosal surfaces, as well as understand their interplay with the mucosal microbiome.  We are also studying the adaptive immune response to polymers, including anti-PEG antibodies, and how it might impact the efficacy of PEGylated therapeutics.  Lastly, we are engineering fusion proteins that can guide targeted delivery of nanomedicine to heterogenous tumors and enable personalized medicine.

Lange, Ethan email , , publications

Dr. Lange’s primary research interests are in the development and application of statistical methods to genetic data. His methodological work has focused on developing techniques for haplotype-based association analyses, linkage analysis, and genetic power analyses.

Lawrence, David S email , , , , , , publications

Living cells have been referred to as the test tubes of the 21st century. New bioactive reagents developed in our lab are designed to function in cells and living organisms. We have prepared enzyme inhibitors, sensors of biochemical pathways, chemically-altered proteins, and activators of gene expression. In addition, many of these agents possess the unique attribute of remaining under our control even after they enter the biological system. In particular, our compounds are designed to be inert until activated by light, thereby allowing us to control their activity at any point in time.

LeCluyse, Edward L email , , , , publications

Dr. Edward (Ed) LeCluyse is currently a Senior Research Investigator in the Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences at The Hamner Institutes of Health Sciences.  Dr. LeCluyse leads a program initiative to identify and develop novel in vitro hepatic model systems to examine cellular responses to drugs and environmental chemicals that target known toxicity pathways. The focus of his research efforts has been to create more organotypic, physiologically-relevant in vitro models that integrate the architectural, cellular and hemodynamic complexities of the liver in vivo.

Lee, Andrew email , , , , publications

We study protein structure and dynamics as they relate to protein function and energetics. We are currently using NMR spectroscopy (e.g. spin relaxation), computation, and a variety of other biophysical techniques to gain a deeper understanding of proteins at atomic level resolution.  Of specific interest is the general phenomenon of long-range communication within protein structures, such as observed in allostery and conformational change.  A. Lee is a member of the Molecular & Cellular Biophysics Training Program.

Lentz, Barry email , , , , publications

The regulatory role of platelet membrane phosphatidylserine in blood coagulation; mechanism of protein-mediated membrane fusion in secretory processes and virus infection.  Director of the Molecular & Cellular Biophysics Training Program.

Li, Bo email , , , , publications

Our research focuses on the discovery and design of new gene-encoded bioactive small molecules from bacteria.  We are interested in understanding enzymes involved in their biosynthesis, their therapeutic mechanisms of action, and implications in health and diseases, in particular with respect to the human microbiome.  This work is driven by intensive development of new metabolomics and genomics technologies.  We subsequently manipulate and engineer these biosynthetic pathways to make new and improved molecules as potential therapeutics such as antibiotics.

Li, Yun email , , publications

The Yun Li group develops statistical methods and computational tools for modern genetic, genomic, and epigenomic data. We do both method development and real data applications. The actual projects in the lab vary from year to year because I am motivated by real data problems, and genomics is arguably (few people argue with me though) THE most fascinating field with new types and huge amount of data generated at a pace more than what we can currently deal with. For current projects, please see: http://www.unc.edu/~yunmli/BCBrotationAds/

Lim, Pei Feng email publications

Chronic pain mechanisms, chronic widespread pain, and co-morbid pain conditions.

Liu, Jian email , , , publications

The overall goal of our research is to develop an enzyme-based approach to synthesize heparin- and heparan sulfate-like therapeutics.  The lab is currently focusing on improving the anticoagulant efficacy of heparin drug as well as synthesizing heparin-like compounds that inhibit herpes simplex virus infections.  We are also interested in using protein and metabolic engineering approaches for preparing polysaccharides with unique biological functions.

Liu, Jiandong email , , , , publications

Congenital heart diseases are one of the most common birth defects in humans, and these arise from developmental defects during embryogenesis.  Many of these diseases have a genetic component, but they might also be affected by environmental factors such as mechanical forces. The Liu Lab combines genetics, molecular and cell biology to study cardiac development and function, focusing on the molecular mechanisms that link mechanical forces and genetic factors to the morphogenesis of the heart.  Our studies using zebrafish as a model system serve as the basic foundation to address the key questions in cardiac development and function, and could provide novel therapeutic interventions for cardiac diseases.

Liu, Rihe email , , , , publications

The research interests of the Liu Lab are in functional proteomics and biopharmaceuticals. Currently we are working on the following projects:  (1). Using systems biology approaches to decipher the signaling pathways mediated by disease-related proteases such as caspases and granzymes and by post-translationally modified histones. We address these problems by performing functional protein selections using mRNA-displayed proteome libraries from human, mouse, Drosophila, and C. elegans. (2). Developing novel protein therapeutics and nucleic acid therapeutics that can be used in tumor diagnosis, treatment, and nanomedicine. We use various amplification-based molecular evolution approaches such as mRNA-display and in vivo SELEX to develop novel single domain antibody mimics on the basis of very stable protein domains or to generate aptamers on the basis of nuclease-resistant nucleic acids, that bind to important biomarkers on the surface of cancer cells. We further conjugate these biomarker-binding affinity reagents to small molecule drugs or nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. (3). Identifying the protein targets of drugs or drug candidates whose action mechanisms are unknown. We combine molecular proteomic and chemical biology approaches to identify the protein targets of drugs whose target-binding affinities are modest.

Liu, Yufeng email , publications

Statistical machine learning and data mining, nonparametric statistics and functional estimation, bioinformatics, design and analysis of experiments

Liu, Zhi email , , , , publications

Biochemistry, cell biology, and immunology of skin, immunopathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory skin blistering diseases.

Lockett, Matthew Ryen email , , , publications

Research in the Lockett group focuses on the development of analytical model systems to: i) chemically modify the surface of thin films, and study chemical and biochemical reactions occurring on those surfaces; ii) study drug metabolism in an environment that closely mimics the human liver; iii) measure tumor invasion in an environment that closely mimics human tissue. /  / While these problems require techniques found in analytical chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, bioengineering, and surface science we are particularly interested in the technologies that allow us to quantitatively measure reactions and analytes.

Loeser, Richard F. email , , , , publications

The Loeser lab uses a combination of in vitro studies in articular chondrocytes and in vivo studies in mice to examine molecular mechanisms of joint tissue destruction in aging and osteoarthritis. A major focus of this work is examining how reactive oxygen species regulate cell signaling through oxidation of Cys residues in specific kinases and phosphatases. Pathways of interest include integrin mediated signaling that stimulates matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and IGF-I signaling that stimulates matrix production. Oxidative stress disrupts the balance in the activity of these pathways to favor matrix destruction over repair contributing to the development of osteoarthritis.

Luebke, Robert email , , , , publications

My interests include immunotoxicant modes of action, developmental immunotoxicity, alternative models to screen and prioritize potential immunotoxicants and shared pathways of toxicity/susceptibility across systems and biological levels of complexity.  Recent projects include exploring the relationship between exposure to amphibole asbestos and the reported increases in systemic autoimmune disease in residents of Libby, MT, developing zebrafish-based alternative methods to screen for developmental immunotoxicants, and most recently, the effects of particulate and gaseous air pollutants on innate and acquired resistance to respiratory pathogens.

Lund, P. Kay email , , , , , , publications

Molecular, cellular and in vivo approaches in intestine to define mechanisms by which hormones and growth factors regulate normal growth and cancer. Uses model cell lines, mutant mice, mouse models of disease, translational approaches to growth factor action and signal transduction, gut immune interactions in obesity.

Lysle, Donald email , publications

Psychoneuroimmunology; the effects of conditioning on lymphocyte reactivity

Macdonald, Jeffrey email , , , publications

Dr. Macdonald is the Founder and Scientific Director of the new Metabolomic Facility and Co-Scientific Director of the joint UNC/NCSU/NOAA Marine MRI facility at Pivers Island near Beaufort NC. Dr. Macdonald’s research goal is to combine metabolomics and tissue engineering and apply these tools to quantitative biosystem analysis.

Mack, Christopher P. email , , , , publications

My research goals are to identify the mechanisms by which environmental factors regulate smooth muscle cell phenotype and to define the transcriptional pathways that regulate SMC-specific gene expression.

Mackman, Nigel email , , , , publications

The major focus of Mackman lab is the procoagulant protein tissue factor. This is the primary cellular initiator of blood coagulation. We study its role in hemostasis, thrombosis, inflammation, ischemia-reperfusion injury and tumor growth.  LPS induction of the tissue factor gene in human monocytic cells and endothelial cells is mediated by various transcription factors, such as AP-1, NF-ĸB and Egr-1. More recently, we found that the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase protein kinase B intracellular signaling pathway suppresses LPS activation of monocytes and endothelial cells.  We found that inhibition of either tissue factor or the downstream coagulation protease thrombin reduced infarct size in a rabbit model of cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury. We showed that the tissue factor-thrombin pathway increased inflammation during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury by inducing chemokine expression and enhancing the recruitment of neutrophils. We have generated a number of mouse models expressing different levels of both mouse and human tissue factor. These mice have been used to provide new insights into the role of tissue factor in hemostasis and thrombosis. In 2007, we developed a new assay to measure levels of microparticle tissue factor in plasma. We found that elevated levels of microparticle tissue factor are associated with venous thromboembolism in cancer patients.

Madden, Michael C. email , , publications

Exposure to ambient air particulate matter  has been associated with increased human deaths and cardiopulmonary morbidity, such as lung infections and increased asthma symptoms.  I am investigating some types of PM and associated gases  that may be associated with those health effects so  to better regulate or manage the sources of the airborne particles which are identified as playing a role in the adverse health outcomes. I am currently focusing on the effects of diesel exhaust using a variety of approaches ranging from exposing cultured human lung and vascular cells to the exhaust, to studying responses of humans exposed out in traffic.  I am currently designing and implementing testing strategies to assess the toxicity of the future types of vehicular emissions. Additionally some of my research effort attempts to identify what populations are more sensitive to the effects of air pollutants, and the genetic, diet, and environmental reasons behind the increased sensitivity.

Maddox, Amy Shaub email , , , , , publications

My research philosophy is summed up by a quote from Nobelist Albert Szent-Gyorgyi: “Discovery is to see what everybody has seen and to think what nobody has thought.” My lab studies the molecular and physical mechanisms of cell shape change during cytokinesis and tissue biogenesis during development. Specifically, we are defining how cells ensure proper alignment and sliding of cytoskeletal filaments, and determining the shape of the cell throughout division. To do so, we combine developmental biology, cell biology, biochemistry, and quantitative image analysis.

Maddox, Paul S. email , , , publications

My research program is centered on understanding fundamental aspects of cell division. During cell division, complex DNA-protein interactions transform diffuse interphase chromatin into discrete mitotic chromosomes, condensing them several thousand fold to facilitate spatial segregation of sister chromatids. Concomitantly, kinetochores form specifically at centromere regions of chromosomes and regulate force-producing interactions with microtubules. While these processes are absolutely required for genomic stability, the in vivo mechanisms of chromosome and kinetochore assembly remain unsolved problems in biology. I investigate 1) the spatiotemporal regulation of mitotic chromosome assembly, and 2) the molecular basis of centromere specification. To do so, I will combine biochemical approaches with high-resolution light microscopy of live cells, whole organisms, and in vitro systems.

Maeda, Nobuyo N. email , , , , , , , publications

Our research is focused on the genetics and molecular pathology of complex multi-factorial conditions in humans – obesity, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, insulin resistance, and hypertension.  These conditions underlie cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, the major cause of death and disabilities in North America. Our approach consists of experiments with mice carrying modifications in various genes important for the maintenance of vascular function, antioxidant defense, and metabolism.  We dissect how gene-gene and gene-environment interaction influences the pathogenesis of these common human conditions and their complications.

Magness, Scott email , , , , publications

The primary focus of my research is to understand the genetic mechanisms underlying stem cell maintenance and differentiation with the goal of translating this information into therapeutic strategies. Using a Sox9EGFP mouse model and FACSorting we are able to specifically enrich for single multipotent intestinal epithelial stem cells that are able to generate mini-guts in a culture system. Our studies are now focused on manipulating, in vitro, the genetics of stem cell behavior through viral gene therapeutics and pharmacologic agents. Additionally, we are developing stem cell transplantation and tissue engineering strategies as therapies for inborn genetic disorders as well as damage and disease of the intestine. Using novel animal models and tissue microarrays from human colon cancers, we are investigating the role of Sox-factors in colorectal cancer.

Magnuson, Terry email , , , , , publications

The Magnuson Lab works in three areas – (i) Novel approaches to allelic series of genomic modifications in mammals, (ii)Mammalian polycomb-group complexes and development, (iii) Mammalian Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complexes

Maixner, William email , , , publications

Dr. Maixner’s research program focuses on identifying the pathophysiological processes that underlie pain perception, persistent pain conditions, and related disorders. His current research focuses on genetic, environmental, biological, and psychological risk factors that contribute to the onset and maintenance of chronic pain conditions. A long term goal of his program is to translate new discoveries into clinical practices that improve the ability to diagnose and treat patients experiencing chronic pain.

Major, Michael Ben email , , , , , publications

The overall goal of my lab is to understand how alterations in signal transduction pathways contribute to human cancer.  To that end, a systems level approach is employed wherein functional genomics, mass spectrometry-based proteomics, gene expression and mutation data are integrated.  The resulting cancer-annotated physical/functional map of a signal transduction pathway provides us with a powerful tool for mechanistic discovery in cancer biology.  We are currently working in lymphoma and lung cancer models, with a focus on the Wnt/b-catenin and Keap1/Nrf2 pathways.

Makowski, Liza email , , , , , publications

The Makowski lab focuses on substrate metabolism or “immunometabolism” in immune cells such as macrophages and metabolic reprogramming in complex diseases such as obesity, insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, and cancer. We use mouse models, cell culture, and metabolomics to study the interaction between inflammation and nutrient sensitive pathways. Projects in lab are funded by NIH, AHA, and the Mary Kay Foundation.  Core Techniques include:  Glucose, fatty acid, cholesterol trafficking and metabolism using radiotracer biochemical studies. Cellular bioenergetics. Digital Immunohistochemical Analysis

Malanga, C.J. email , , , , publications

Physiology and pharmacology of the basal ganglia; neurobiology of motivation and reward; substance abuse neurobiology; and neurobehavioral teratology. My laboratory studies the function of neural circuitry involved in the perception of reward and the reinforcement of motivated behaviors in several mouse models of neurodevelopmental disorders, including early developmental exposure to drugs of abuse, such as alcohol or cocaine; and genetic models relevant to the study of autism, such as inactivation of the Fmr1 (Fragile-X Mental Retardation) or MeCP2 (Methyl-CpG Binding Protein) genes.  My laboratory employs techniques in behavioral pharmacology, including intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS); in vitro patch-clamp electrophysiology in acute brain slices; and immunohistochemistry with unbiased stereological microscopy.

Maness, Patricia F. email , , , publications

My research focuses on molecular mechanisms of mammalian nervous system development. We investigate mechanisms by which developing neurons migrate to the neocortex and form connections.

Manis, Paul B. email , , , , publications

We are interested in the cellular and network mechanisms of sensory information processing in the central nervous system, with an emphasis on the neural substrates for hearing. We study functional network organization, synaptic function, the roles of ion channels and cellular excitability, and short and long-term synaptic plasticity, in the auditory brainstem and auditory cortex.  Experimentally, we use patch clamp methods in brain slices, optogenetics and laser scanning photostimulation, multiphoton imaging, and computational neuroscience (modeling), in normal and transgenic mouse models. The lab also has collaborative projects related to schizophrenia (prefrontal cortex; Dr. Patricia Maness, UNC) and connectomics (cochlear nucleus and MNTB; Dr. George Spirou, WVU).

Marchetti, Adrian email , , , , publications

We are a biological oceanography lab that performs inquiry-based science by combining physiological and molecular approaches in laboratory isolates and natural communities to investigate how marine microorganisms are affected by their environment and in turn, influence ocean biogeochemistry and ecosystem dynamics. Particular interests include studying trace metals, such as iron, that are essential for the nutrition of phytoplankton and predicting the effects of future climate changes on phytoplankton distribution and abundance.  We implement the use of environmental genomic approaches (e.g. RNA-seq) to ascertain the ways in which marine microbes have adapted and acclimate to varying environmental conditions.

Margolis, David email , , , , publications

The overall goal of our laboratory is to obtain new insights into the host-virus interaction, particularly in HIV infection, and translate discoveries in molecular biology and virology to the clinic to aid in the treatment of HIV infection. A subpopulation of HIV-infected lymphocytes is able to avoid viral or immune cytolysis and return to the resting state. Current work focuses on the molecular mechanisms that control the latent reservoir of HIV infection within resting T cells. We have found that cellular transcription factors widely distributed in lymphocytes can remodel chromatin and maintain quiescence of the HIV genome in resting CD4+ lymphocytes. These studies give insight into the basic molecular mechanisms of eukaryotic gene expression, as well as new therapeutic approaches for HIV infection.

Markovic-Plese, Silva email , , , , , publications

My long-term goal is to understand and therapeutically target the key mechanisms of disease development in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).  Our research has been focused on the molecular events involved in the initiation of the autoimmune response in MS, and on the mechanisms of action of immunomodulatory therapies for this disabling disease.  Current projects in the laboratory include transcriptional and proteomic profiling of the peripheral blood cells and cerebrospinal fluid obtained from patients in the early phase of the disease, which lead to the discovery of the high levels of IL-11 in the CSF and its high up-regulation in the blood-derived CD4+ T-cells in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) suggestive of MS. Our center is uniquely positioned to perform the proposed research, having an access to the clinical samples through the integrated clinical and cellular/molecular biology research.

Marzluff, William email , , , , , , , , , publications

We are interested in the mechanisms by which histone protein synthesis is coupled to DNA replication, both in mammalian cell cycle and during early embryogenesis in Drosophila, Xenopus and sea urchins.

Matera, Greg email , , , , , , publications

Research in our laboratory is focused on RNA. We aim to understand how ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs, mRNPs, etc.) are transcribed, packaged and transported to their final destinations in the cell.  We are also interested in the genetic and epigenetic forces that direct formation of microscopically visible subcellular structures (e.g. nuclear bodies). We use a combination of approaches, including Drosophila genetics, molecular cell biology, biochemistry, digital imaging microscopy and genome-wide analyses. Projects in the lab are focused on two areas:  models of a neurogenetic disease called Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) and the functional analysis of post-translational modifications of chromatin and RNA-binding proteins important in cancer and other diseases.

Matson, Steven email , , , , , publications

Research in our laboratory is focused on the enzymatic mechanisms and biological roles of DNA helicases which convert duplex DNA to ssDNA for use as a template in DNA replication and repair or as a substrate in recombination.  Defects in genes encoding DNA helicases have been linked to genomic instability leading to a variety of progeriod disorders and human cancers. Our long-range goal is to understand the mechanism of action of helicases and to define their roles in DNA metabolism. The lab also has an interest in the process of DNA transfer by bacterial conjugation – the unidirectional and horizontal transmission of genetic information from one cell to another. Conjugative DNA transfer plays a role in increasing genetic diversity in addition to propagating the spread of antibiotic resistance and microbial virulence factors. Our long-range goal is to define the function and regulation of the relaxosome, and each protein in this nucleoprotein complex, in conjugative DNA transfer.

Matsushima, Glenn K email , , , , , , publications

Our laboratory is interested in innate immune responses during injury to the central nervous system and during inflammation during microbial infections.  Our laboratory has a special interest in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus.  We also are pursuing drug discovery projects targeting receptors that may modulate demyelinating disease and immune responses.  We use molecular, cellular and biochemical approaches both in vitro and in vivo to identify the function of key mediators during pathogenesis.

McCarthy, Ken email , , , , , publications

Investigating the role of astrocyte signaling in brain function.

McKay, Daniel email , , , , , publications

Research in the lab focuses on how a single genome gives rise to a variety of cell types and body parts during development. We use Drosophila as a model organism to investigate (1) how transcription factors access DNA to regulate complex patterns of gene expression, and (2) how post-translational modification of histones contributes to maintenance of gene expression programs over time. We combine genomic approaches (e.g. chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing) with Drosophila genetics and transgenesis to address both of these questions. Defects in cell fate specification and maintenance of cell identity often occur in human diseases, including cancer.

Meeker, Rick email , , , , publications

Dr. Meeker’s research is focused on the mechanisms of HIV neuropathogenesis and the development of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neuroinflammation. Inflammatory changes within the brain caused by the viral infection initiate a toxic cascade that disrupts normal neural function and can eventually lead to neuronal death. To explore the mechanisms responsible for this damage, we investigate changes in calcium homeostasis, glutamate receptor function and inflammatory responses in primary neuronal, microglial and macrophage cultures. New therapeutic approaches targeted to signal transduction pathways and calcium regulation that protect the neurons and reduce inflammation are under investigation.

Meissner, Gerhard email , , , , , publications

The goal of the laboratory’s research is to define the structure and function of an intracellular Ca2+ release channel in skeletal and cardiac muscle, using molecular biological and electrophysiological methods and by creating mutant mice.

Meshnick, Steven email , publications

Our group studies the molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis of malaria and other vector-borne diseases.   We study malaria-infected individuals and populations in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Thailand, Cambodia, India, and the Gambia in order to understand the evolution and spread of drug resistance and the pathogenesis of malaria in pregnant women.   We also study parasite iron metabolism and cytoadherence.   Recently, we have begun working on vector-parasite interactions for tick-borne diseases in the US and for Chagas’ disease in Latin America.

Miao, Edward A email , , , publications

We study the mechanisms by which innate immunity detects virulence factor activity in pathogenic bacteria. Research focuses on how macrophages detect bacterial type III secretion systems through the inflammasome, which activates Caspase-1, promoting secretion of the cytokines IL-1b and IL-18, as well as pyroptotic cell death. We manipulate bacterial virulence genetically and probe how this alters innate immune detection during infection. This focus joins the fields of microbial pathogenesis and immunology, utilizing the knowledge and tools of both disciplines.

Miller, C. Ryan email , , , , , , , , , , publications

My laboratory studies diffuse gliomas, devastating primary tumors of the central nervous system for which few effective drugs are currently available.  We utilize genetically engineered mice, cell culture, and human tumor model systems to explore the molecular pathogenesis of gliomas.  We utilize animal model systems to develop drugs and diagnostic markers for their individualized therapy.  Rotating students gain experience with multiple techniques, including cell culture, molecular biology, genomics, genetic lineage tracing, fluorescence microscopy, and digital image analysis.

Miller, Laura email , , , , , publications

Miller’s research group focuses on topics in integrative biophysics: physics applied to biology at the level of cells to organisms. In particular, the group is interested in the role of fluid forces during locomotion and morphogenesis. One ongoing project is focused on understanding the aerodynamics of flight in the smallest insects. Another current project investigates the role of fluid forces during the development of the embryonic vertebrate heart.

Miller, Virginia L email , , , publications

Molecular genetic analysis of virulence of Yersinia and Klebsiella: My laboratory uses Yersinia enterocolitica, Y. pestis, and Klebsiella as model systems to study bacterial pathogenesis. The long-term goals of our work are to understand the bacteria-host interaction at the molecular level to learn how this interaction affects the pathogenesis of infections and to understand how these pathogens co-ordinate the expression of virulence determinants during an infection. To do this we use genetic, molecular and immunological approaches in conjunction with the mouse model of infection. [Note: I will be moving my laboratory to UNC-CH in the summer of 2008]

Mitchell, Charles email , , , , publications

My work focuses on the role of plant pathogens in (A) controlling or facilitating biological invasions by plants, (B) structuring plant communities, and (C) modulating the effects of global change on terrestrial ecosystems.  My group works on viruses, bacteria, and fungi that infect wild plants, chiefly grasses and other herbaceous species. Ultimately, I am interested in the implications of these processes for the sustainable provisioning of ecosystem services and for the conservation of biological diversity.

Mohlke, Karen email , , , , , publications

We identify genetic variants that influence common human traits with complex inheritance patterns, and we examine the molecular and biological mechanisms of the identified variants and the genes they affect. Currently we are investigating susceptibility to type 2 diabetes and obesity, and variation in cholesterol levels, body size, body shape, and metabolic traits. We detect allelic differences in chromatin structure and gene expression and examine gene function in human cell lines and tissues. In addition to examining the primary effects of genes, the lab is exploring the interaction of genes with environmental risk factors in disease pathogenesis. Approaches include genome-wide association studies, molecular biology, cell biology, genetic epidemiology, sequencing, and bioinformatic analysis of genome-wide data sets.

Moody, Cary email , , , , publications

The work in my laboratory focuses on the molecular biology of human papillomaviruses (HPV), small DNA viruses that exhibit epithelial tropism. Certain types of HPV are considered the causative agents of cervical cancer and are also associated with cancers of the anus, oropharynx and esophagus.  My lab is interested in defining mechanisms that regulate the productive phase of the HPV life cycle, which is restricted to differentiating epithelia and includes viral genome amplification, late gene expression and virion production. Using various methods of epithelial differentiation, we are studying how HPV proteins modulate cell signaling pathways, including the DNA damage response and apoptosis, to facilitate viral replication, which in turn contributes to viral pathogenesis and possibly transformation. I will be accepting rotation students beginning in the winter of 2010.

Moorman, Nat email , , , , publications

How does a virus gain control over the host cell? My laboratory is interested in answering this question at the molecular level. By combining molecular biology and virology with new technologies (e.g. mass spectrometry, next generation sequencing), we investigate the mechanisms utilized by viruses to hijack infected cells. By understanding the specific function(s) of viral proteins during infection, we identify strategies used by viruses for deregulation of host cell processes. We use this information to characterize novel features of cell signaling pathways during infection, and to identify potential targets for anti-viral therapeutics.

Morrow, Leslie email , , , , , , publications

Function, expression and trafficking GABA-A receptors in the CNS; effects of chronic ethanol exposure that leads to ethanol tolerance and dependence; role of endogenous neurosteroids on ethanol action and ethanol-induced adaptations. Role of neuroactive steroids in neuropsychiatric disease, including addiction, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, inflammatory disorders.

Nackley, Andrea email , , , , , , publications

Our lab studies the neurobiological processes underlying persistent pain as well as unique markers for the diagnosis of clinical pain conditions. We integrate molecular genetics, animal models, and clinical epidemiologic measures to 1) characterize signaling processes that drive persistent pain conditions, 2) evaluate the potential functionality of common genetic polymorphisms that interact with environmental events to produce persistent pain conditions, and 3) identify biological markers predictive for the development of persistent pain conditions, including the severity and duration of the disorder as well as optimal management strategies for different individuals. This work will ultimately provide novel targets for the development of effective individualized pain therapeutics.

Nagarajan, Uma M email , , , , , publications

Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted bacterial pathogen that causes Fallopian tube inflammation and subsequent tubal infertility in women.  Our current research interest is to investigate the role of an innate immune responses to chlamydial infection and its role in genital tract pathology in a mouse model of genital infection.  Specifically, we are interested in delineating pathogen recognition by the host, signaling pathways that lead to the induction of innate immune cytokines in vitro and their downstream cellular effects in vivo.  We are specifically interested in understanding the contribution type I IFN, IL-1 activation, caspases and damage associated molecular patterns in pathogenesis. The identification of host molecules involved in amplification of the inflammatory response during infection, would serve as biomarkers and therapeutic targets to prevent reproductive sequelae in women infected with Chlamydia.

Narotsky, Michael email , , publications

My research interests include the endocrinology of pregnancy and parturition; reproductive and developmental toxicity testing; mixtures toxicology; structure-activity relationships; axial skeletal development; and strain differences in toxic responses.

Neher, Saskia email , , , , publications

Our lab seeks to better understand the maturation and regulation of a group of human lipases.  We aim to uncover how these lipases properly fold and exit the ER, and how their activity is subsequently regulated.  We study the membrane-bound and secreted proteins that play a role in lipase regulation.  Our research can potentially impact human health as biochemical deficiencies in lipase activity can cause hypertriglyceridemia and associated disorders, such as diabetes and atherosclerosis.  We are an interdisciplinary lab and aim to address these questions using a variety of techniques, including membrane protein biochemistry, enzymology, and structural and molecular biology.

Nicholas, Robert A. email , , , , , , publications

My laboratory has two main interests: 1) Regulation of P2Y receptor signaling and trafficking in epithelial cells and platelets. Our laboratory investigates the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which P2Y receptors are differentially targeted to distinct membrane surfaces of polarized epithelial cells and the regulation of P2Y receptor signaling during ADP-promoted platelet aggregation. 2) Antibiotic resistance mechanisms. We investigate the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in the pathogenic bacterium, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Our laboratory investigates how acquisition of mutant alleles of existing genes confers resistance to penicillin and cephalosporins. We also study the biosynthesis of the gonococcal Type IV pilus and its contribution to antibiotic resistance.

Nichols, Timothy C. email , publications

My research interests include the role of von Willebrand factor in thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Our current lab work focuses on the molecular biology of porcine von Willebrand factor.

Nylander-French, Leena email , , publications

My research focuses on understanding the relationship between dermal and inhalation exposure and the effect of individual genetic differences on the function of enzymes that detoxify hazardous agents and that affect the development of disease. My research group has pioneered approaches to quantitatively measure skin and inhalation exposures to toxicants; additionally, my group has developed sophisticated exposure modeling tools using mathematical and statistical principles in an effort to standardize and improve exposure and risk assessment.

O’Brien, Deborah email , , , , , , publications

Our lab investigates molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate spermatogenesis, sperm motility and fertilization.  A major focus of our current research is sperm energy metabolism, particularly the function of glycolytic isozymes with restricted expression in the male germline.  Our translational studies examine sperm metabolism in infertile patients and use structure-based drug design to develop selective inhibitors of sperm glycolysis as potential contraceptives.  We are also studying the genetics of male infertility through phenotypic and genotypic analyses of mouse lines that are becoming extinct in the Collaborative Cross, a large panel of recombinant inbred strains being developed as a mammalian reference population for the analysis of complex traits.

Ostrowski, Lawrence E email , , , , publications

The overall focus of research in my laboratory is to improve the diagnosis and treatment of airway diseases, especially those that result from impaired mucociliary clearance. In particular, our efforts focus on the diseases cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia, two diseases caused by genetic mutations that impair mucociliary clearance and lead to recurrent lung infections. The work in our laboratory ranges from basic studies of ciliated cells and the proteins that make up the complex structure of the motile cilia, to translational studies of new drugs and gene therapy vectors. We use a number of model systems, including traditional and inducible animal models, in vitro culture of differentiated mouse and human airway epithelial cells, and direct studies of human tissues. We also use a wide range of experimental techniques, from studies of RNA expression and proteomics to measuring ciliary activity in cultured cells and whole animals.

Otey, Carol email , , , , publications

My lab studies the molecular pathways that regulate cell motility, especially within the contexts of wound-healing, tissue remodeling after injury, and cancer metastasis.  We want to understand how normal, physiological processes such as wound-closure differ from pathological processes such as the initiation and progression of fibrosis, or the spread of cancer to secondary sites.  Our work utilizes cultured cell lines, mouse models of disease, and human patient samples to address these questions.

Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando email , , , , , , publications

Non-Mendelian genetics including, meiotic drive, parent-of-orifin effects and allelic exclusion.

Parise, Leslie email , , , , , , , publications

The overall goal of our laboratory is to understand the molecular interface between cell signaling and adhesion receptors in blood diseases and cancer in order to develop novel therapeutic targets and approaches. One area of study is platelets because they become activated by cellular signals and adhere to each other and the blood vessel wall via specific adhesion receptors. These events can block blood flow, causing heart attacks and stroke, the leading causes of death in the US. Another area of research is sickle cell disease, since red blood cells in these patients are abnormally adhesive and also cause blood vessel blockages. A third area is cancer since cancer cells use similar cellular signals and adhesion receptors in tumorigenesis and metastasis. Our work involves a wide array  of technologies that include molecular, structural and cellular approaches as well as clinical/translational studies with human patients.

Pecot, Chad Victor email , , , , publications

The development of metastases is the cause of death in nearly all cancer patients, yet the mechanisms driving metastatic biology remain poorly understood. Also, few cancer therapeutics are being developed to specifically control this problem. My laboratory is interested in discovering novel mechanisms that drive metastatic biology, and in utilizing RNA interference (RNAi) strategies (such as nanoparticle delivery of miRNAs/siRNAs) to control this process. We will apply integrative analysis of large bioinformatic datasets, in vitro studies for mechanistic validation, and in vivo metastasis models to assess therapeutic efficacy of our RNAi approaches.

Peden, David B. email , publications

Translational and clinical research in environmental lung disease.

Peet, Robert email , , , , publications

My research focuses on plant community ecology and such related fields as plant geography, conservation biology, ecoinformatics and plant population ecology. I am particularly interested in how plant communities are assembled and vary across landscapes.   Toward this end I am helping define the emerging discipline of ecoinformatics through development of international databases and standards for large-scale data integration and exchange.  My current research on the vegetation of the Southeastern United States includes on-going studies of the long-term dynamics of Southeastern forests, human impacts on floodplain ecosystems, targets for restoration, and more generally factors influencing the composition and species diversity of terrestrial plant communities across a range of spatial scales.

Peifer, Mark email , , , , , , publications

Cell adhesion, signal transduction, and cytoskeletal regulation during embryogenesis and in cancer.  We focus on the regulation of cadherin-based cell-cell adhesion, and on Wnt signaling and its regulation by the tumor suppressor APC.

Perou, Charles M. email , , , , , , , publications

Human carcinomas show great diversity in their morphologies, clinical histories and in their responsiveness to therapy. This wide tumor diversity poses the main challenge to the effective treatment of cancer patients. The main focus of the Perou Lab is to characterize the biology diversity of human tumors using microarray analysis, genomics, molecular genetics, and cell biology, and then to mimic these findings in animal models. We ultimately use these animal systems to develop predictive computational models and to test new therapeutics that are specific for each tumor subtype.

Philpot, Ben email , , , , publications

My lab is driven to understand the neuronal pathologies underlying neurodevelopmental disorders, and to use this information to identify novel therapeutics.  We focus our research on monogenic autism spectrum disorders, including Angelman, Rett, and Pitt-Hopkins syndromes.  We employ a diverse number of techniques including: electrophysiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, mouse engineering, and in vivo imaging.

Pickles, Raymond J. email , , , publications

My laboratory, located in the Cystic Fibrosis/Pulmonary Research and Treatment Center in the Thurston-Bowles building at UNC, is interested in how respiratory viruses infect the airway epithelium of the conducting airways of the human lung.

Pielak, Gary J. email , , , , , publications

My graduate students and I use the formalism of equilibrium thermodynamics and the tools of molecular biology and biophysics to understand how nature designs proteins.

Piven, Joseph email publications

Dr. Piven’s research focus is on the pathogenesis of autism including neural mechanisms, genetic basis and neuropsychological and behavioral phenotype.

Pomp, Daniel email , , , , , , publications

Dr. Pomp studies the genetic architecture of complex traits, with an emphasis on body weight regulation and obesity. Using polygenic mouse models and high throughput approaches integrating genomics and physiology, he identifies genes that control predisposition to a variety of complex traits including energy intake and energy expenditure (e.g. voluntary exercise). In addition, Dr. Pomp studies how these genes interact with each other, with changing environments such as nutritional interventions, and with other diseases such as cancer.

Prins, Jan F. email , , , , publications

Our group develops computational methods for the analysis of high throughput sequence data.  Our focus is on transcriptome analysis and its applications.

Purvis, Jeremy email , , , , , publications

We study the behavior of individual cells with a specific focus on “irreversible” cell fate decisions such as apoptosis, senescence, and differentiation. Why do genetically identical cells choose different fates? How much are these decisions controlled by the cell itself and how much is influenced by its environment? We address these questions using a variety of experimental and computational approaches including time-lapse microscopy, single-molecule imaging, computational modeling, and machine learning. Our ultimate goal is to not only understand how cells make decisions under physiological conditions—but to discover how to manipulate these decisions to treat disease.

Qian, Li email , , , , publications

Our laboratory is interested in developing innovative approaches to regenerate or repair an injured heart. Our goal is to understand the molecular basis of cardiomyocyte specification and maturation and apply this knowledge to improve efficiency and clinical applicability of cellular reprogramming in heart disease. To achieve these goals, we utilize in vivo modeling of cardiac disease in the mouse, including myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac hypertrophy, chronic heart failure and congenital heart disease (CHD). In addition, we take advantage of traditional mouse genetics, cell and molecular biology, biochemistry and newly developed reprogramming technologies (iPSC and iCM) to investigate the fundamental events underlying the progression of various cardiovascular diseases as well as to discover the basic mechanisms of cell reprogramming.

Ramsden, Dale email , , , , , publications

The end joining pathway is a major means for repairing chromosome breaks in vertebrates.  My lab is using cellular and cell-free models to learn how end joining works, and what happens when it doesn’t.

Randell, Scott email , , , , , , , publications

Identification of airway epithelial stem cells; innate immunity in the airway; the pathophysiology of post-lung transplant ischemia reperfusion injury and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome.

Rathmell, Kimryn email , , , publications

The focus of my research group is the tumorigenesis of renal cell carcinoma.  Our approach utilizes genetically engineered cells expressing clinically important point mutations in genes identified from renal cancers.  Using cellular and animal models we are able to investigate processes integral to tumorigenesis including angiogenesis, hypoxic response signaling, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cell cycle signaling.  Using data from the experimental models, I oversee a clinical research program that offers biologically active protocols to patients with renal cell carcinoma and examines correlative radiographic and serum or tumor biomarkers of tumor response to treatment.

Reader, John email , , , publications

Our laboratory studies the molecular evolution of nucleic acids and the protein translation apparatus with a particular focus on tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. We are also applying these studies to produce novel molecular therapeutics for the treatment of disease.

Redinbo, Matt email , , , , , , , publications

The Redinbo Laboratory examines dynamic cellular processes using structural, chemical, molecular and cell biology. Our goals are to discover new drugs and to elucidate molecular pathways essential to human disease.  Current projects include developing the first drugs that target the human microbiome, unraveling the nature of innate immunity in the human lung, and discovering how microbial systems exchange genes, including those that encode antibiotic resistance.

Reed, Jason email , , , , , publications

Regulation of plant development:  We use techniques of genetics, molecular biology, microscopy, physiology, and biochemistry to study how endogenous developmental programs and exogenous signals cooperate to determine plant form.  The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has numerous technical advantages that allow rapid experimental progress.  We focus on how the plant hormone auxin acts in several different developmental contexts.  Among questions of current interest are i) how auxin regulates patterning in embryos and ovules, ii) how light modifies auxin response, iii) how feedback loops affect kinetics or patterning of auxin response, iv) how flower opening and pollination are regulated, and v) whether natural variation in flower development affects rates of self-pollination vs. outcrossing.

Reid, Lola email , , , publications

Two dynamically interacting sets of mechanisms govern tissue-specific gene expression and cell growth. 1) mechanisms in lineage biology regulate stem cells and their descendents, processes that define the repertoire of genes available to be regulated and 2) signal transduction mechanisms, induced by the synergistic effects of extracellular matrix components and soluble signals (hormones, growth factors), regulate the expression of the available genes. Studies in the lab focus on both classes of mechanisms in normal versus neoplastic tissue.

Reisner, Howard email , , publications

My interests include the use of immunological and molecular probes to study function of normal and abnormal coagulation factors; the study of factors regulating human immune response to coagulation factors; and immunochemical studies of antigen-antibody interaction.

Reissner, Kathryn email , , , , publications

Research in our lab is focused on understanding how cocaine abuse affects glial cell physiology, in particular neuron-astrocyte communication.  We utilize the rat cocaine self-administration/reinstatement model, which allows us to test hypotheses regarding not only how chronic cocaine use affects properties of astrocytes and the tripartite synapse, but also how compounds affecting glial cells may influence synaptic processing within the brain’s reward neurocircuitry and behavioral measures of drug seeking.

Richards, Kristy L. email , , , , publications

My research interests include genetic and genomic approaches to understanding lymphoma biology and treatment.  As members the Center for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy (CPIT), we are involved in a project using genome-wide association studies to identify SNPs associated with sensitivity to a variety of chemotherapy agents.  Also, we are using genomic strategies to characterize a canine model of lymphoma in pet dogs that could be used to provide a more representative animal model for therapeutic trials.  I am also the UNC principal investigator on several clinical trials that focus on HIV related lymphoma.

Richardson, Anthony email , , , , publications

In the Richardson Lab, we study bacterial physiology as it pertains to human disease.  Primarily, we focus on the metabolic adaptations mounted by bacterial pathogens (e.g. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus spp.) to avoid clearance by host innate immunity.  We use a combination of bacterial genetics, molecular biology, microbial physiology and computational modeling to probe the metabolic state of pathogens during infection.  Given the complexities of host/pathogen interactions, metabolic flexibility in invading pathogens is a crucial aspect of bacterial virulence.

Riordan, John email , , publications

The primary research focus is the structure, function and biosynthetic processing of membrane proteins which provide permeability pathways through the membranes of cells. Much of the current work is concentrated on the ion channel protein, CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) which is absent or dysfunctional in patients with cystic fibrosis. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of CFTR function, we study single channel properties by electrophysiological techniques, enzymatic activity and physical interaction with other cellular molecules. A major objective of studies with the purified molecule is to obtain 3-dimensional structure information so that small molecules capable of recognizing features of its surface shape can be synthesized and used to modulate its folding and activity.

Robinson, Donita email , , , , publications

The Robinson lab currently explores the neurodynamics of reinforcement pathways in the brain by using state-of-the-art, in vivo recording techniques in freely moving rats. Our goal is to understand the interplay of mesostriatal, mesocortical and corticostriatal circuits that underlie action selection, both in the context of normal development and function, and in the context of psychiatric disorders that involve maladaptive behavior, such as alcohol use disorder, adolescent vulnerability to drug use and addiction, cocaine-induced maternal neglect and binge-eating disorders.

Rogers, Arlin B email , , , , publications

We study liver cancer in mouse models with a focus on how sex influences disease risk. In both humans and rodents, males get liver cancer much more frequently than females. We take a comparative approach that integrates pathology with infectious disease, toxicology, metabolism, genetics, epigenetics, and intracellular signaling. We discovered that loss of sex-specific hepatic function, or liver-gender disruption, is strongly associated with cancer and are pursuing the molecular basis of this. We also perform translational research evaluating the influence of gender on human liver diseases.

Rogers, Steve email , , , , , publications

The research in our lab is centered on understanding the mechanisms and principles of movement at the cellular level. Cytoskeletal filaments – composed of actin and microtubules – serve as a structural scaffolding that gives cells the ability to divide, crawl, and change their shape.  Our lab uses a combination of cell biological, biochemical, functional genomic, and  high resolution imaging techniques to study cytoskeletal dynamics and how they contribute to cellular motion.

Roth, Bryan email , , , publications

The ultimate goal of our studies is to discover novel ways to treat human disease using G-protein coupled receptors.

Rubenstein, David email , , , , publications

The work in my lab is focused on the regulation of cell adhesion and the inter-relationship between alterations in adhesion and the biology of the cell. Our lab has made several key observations on the molecular mechanisms by which acantholysis proceeds in the human autoimmune blistering diseases pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus.  The presence or absence of adhesion represents a major biologic shift requiring coordination amongst various biological processes, including those regulating adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and cell death.  The intracellular regulatory and signalling events observed in pemphigus acantholysis likely represent variations of normal physiologic mechanisms regulating the presence/absence of desmosome-mediated cell-cell adhesion in epidermal epithelia.  We proposes that these events are important for regulating transitions in cell-adhesion and likely have a central role in adhesion transitions occuring during such processes as wound healing, tumor cell proliferation and invasion.  Current projects in the lab are focused on furthering work on the mechanism of pemphigus acantholysis as well as elucidating the role of desmosomes in wound healing and cancer biology.

Samet, James M. email , publications

Our laboratory is interested in the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control  inflammatory responses induced by inhalation of ambient air pollutants. Projects focus on early events that result in the disregulation of signaling processes that regulate mediator expression. Approaches include real-time molecular imaging of human lung cells exposed in vitro and ex-vivo.

Samulski, Jude email , , , , , publications

We are engaged in studying the molecular biology of the human parvovirus adeno-associated virus (AAV) with the intent to using this virus for developing a novel, safe, and efficient delivery system for human gene therapy.

Sancar, Aziz email , , , , , publications

We have three main areas of research focus: (1) Nucleotide excision repair: The only known mechanism for the removal of bulky DNA adducts in humans. (2) DNA damage checkpoints:  Biochemical pathways that transiently block cell cycle progression while DNA contains damage.  (3) Circadian rhythm:  The oscillations in biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes that occur with the periodicity of about 24 hours.

Sartor, R. Balfour email , , , , publications

Our long term goals are to better define mechanisms of chronic intestinal inflammation and to identify areas for therapeutic intervention. Research in our laboratories is in the following four general areas: 1) Induction and perpetuation of chronic intestinal and extraintestinal inflammation by resident intestinal bacteria and their cell wall polymers, 2) Mechanisms of genetically determined host susceptibility to bacterial product,. 3) Regulation of immunosuppressive molecules in intestinal epithelial cells and 4) Performing clinical trials of novel therapeutic agents in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

Searles, Lillie L. email , , , publications

My lab is interested in mechanisms that (1) fine tune gene expression and (2) coordinate transcription and RNA processing in eukaryotes. Our work is based on molecular, genetic and biochemical analysis of the suppressor of sable gene of Drosophila.

Segal, Rick email publications

Movement control and neuroplasticity in able-bodied humans and humans with neurological dysfunction are the focus of research program. More specifically, would like to understand the basic interaction of spinal circuits and supraspinal systems and adaptability of these interactions during upper limb movements and locomotion. Studies to understand this interaction include anatomical (dissection and MRI), electrophysiological (EMG and reflex) and biomechanical studies to identify the neuromuscular elements that interact with spinal circuits, and what principles govern their coordination. Studies are also underway to understand plasticity of spinal circuits, including those underlying stretch reflexes in both able-bodied humans and humans with spinal cord injury. These studies utilize operant conditioning of reflexes that may be useful for the functional training of newly formed connections in spinal cord injured patients if regeneration can be induced. The operant conditioning studies will also be useful in determining the relationship of spinal circuits and voluntary movement.

Sekelsky, Jeff email , , , , publications

Genome instability is a major cause of cancer. We use the model organism Drosophila melanogaster to study maintenance of genome stability, including DNA double-strand break repair, meiotic and mitotic recombination, and characterization of fragile sites in the genome.  Our primary approaches are genetic (forward and reverse, transmission and molecular), but we are also using biochemistry to study protein complexes of interest, genomics to identify fragile sites and understand the regulation of meiotic recombination, fluorescence and electron microscopy for analysis of mutant phenotypes, and cell culture for experiments using RNA interference.

Serody, Jonathan email , , , publications

Our laboratory is involved in studies to determine the mechanisms and proteins involved in the migration of alloreactive and regulatory T cells to organs involved in graft-versus-host disease after stem cell transplantation using mouse models.

Sethupathy, Praveen email , , , , , publications

The overall goal of my research program is to define the role of non-coding RNAs in gene regulatory networks that contribute to the molecular pathology of complex diseases, with a primary focus on diabetes and related metabolic disorders.  Specifically, my lab investigates: (1) the contribution of small RNA networks to gene expression dynamics; (2) small RNA mediated regulation of metabolic pathways; (3) non-coding RNAs as both biomarkers of physiologic status and therapeutic targets; (4) regulatory variants within the microRNA (miRNA) regulome that predispose to disease; and (5) novel forms of intercellular communication via regulated transfer of small RNAs.

Shank, Elizabeth email , , , , , , publications

My laboratory studies chemically mediated interactions between microbes, particularly those that lead to alterations in bacterial development. In the natural world, interspecies chemical communication contributes to the stability and function of complex microbial communities. We explore the mechanisms and molecules that microbes use to influence their microbial neighbors both in the laboratory and in natural environments using genetics, microscopy, chemical imaging, and next generation sequencing. Our goal is to gain insights into microbial ecology, identify compounds with novel bioactivities, and obtain chemical tools to manipulate bacterial behavior to our benefit.

Sharpless, Norman (Ned) email , , , , , , publications

The lab relies on murine genetic approaches to study the roles of the INK4/ARF tumor suppressor locus in human cancer and aging.  At present, the lab has two main focuses:  Stem Cell Aging:
Cancer and degenerative diseases are much more common in old people than young.  Although this has been well-recognized in clinical medicine for decades, scientists do not agree as to why this occurs.  Recently, work from several labs including our own has shown that humans age, in part, because important regenerative cells lose their capacity to divide with the passage of time.  That is, the tissues and organs from old people are less able to replace and regenerate lost or damaged cells than the corresponding tissues and organs from young people.  Our lab has studied mechanisms that underlie this age-dependent failure of cell division; in fact, we have shown the surprising result that cellular programs that function to prevent cancer untowardly also calls aging.  Specifically, cellular senescence is now believed to be of major importance in the process of aging.  Senescence refers to a permanent growth arrest induced in formerly dividing cells by the activation of genes that prevent cancer.  The good news in this system is that the normal functioning of these tumor suppressor genes prevents cancer; the bad news is that these same genetic events appear to cause aging by activating cellular senescence.  Melanoma and Murine Models of Cancer:  Because of the important role of p16INK4a in preventing melanoma, the lab has long been interested in this particularly deadly form of skin cancer.  Specifically, we are interested in using genetically engineered models of cancer to study melanoma genetics.  We have shown a role for the p16INK4a-RB and ARF-p53 tumor suppressor pathways in repressing this important human cancer in response to RAS-RAF activation.  We have generated highly faithful models of human melanoma, and have used these to study novel therapeutics.  We have also discovered a novel human melanoma sub-type based on expression profiling, and have identified a new therapeutic target (CD200) for treatment of melanoma.

Shih, Yen-Yu Ian email , , , , publications

Dr. Shih is the Director of Small Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) at the Biomedical Research Imaging Center. His lab has implemented multi-model MRI techniques at high magnetic field to measure cerebral blood oxygenation, blood flow, blood volume, and oxygen metabolism changes in preclinical animal models. Dr. Shih’s lab is also developing simultaneous functional MRI (fMRI) and electrophysiology recording techniques at high spatial resolution to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms of neurovascular diseases. They will apply these techniques to (i) explore/validate functional connectivity network and neurovascular coupling in the rodent brain, (ii) study tissue characteristics after stroke, and (iii) investigate deep brain electrical stimulation, optogenetic stimulation, and pharmacogenetic stimulation in normal and Parkinsonian animal models.

Simpson, Dennis email , , publications

Cell biology, molecular biology and virology

Singleton, Scott email , , , , publications

The Singleton Laboratory is interested in understanding the molecular basis for the develoment and transmission of microbial drug resistance and the discovery and exploitation of new strategies for controlling drug-resistant microorganisms. We develop and adapt synthetic chemistry and synthetic biology methods to provide new molecular tools — both biologically active small molecules and innovative platforms — for hypothesis-driven biological research and pharmaceutical discovery. These foundations of our program offers both chemically-oriented and biologically-oriented researchers new opportunities for the development of integrated, multi-disciplinary knowledge and technologies.

Slep, Kevin email , , , , , , , publications

Our lab examines cytoskeletal dynamics, the molecules that regulate it and the biological processes it is involved in using live cell imaging, in vitro reconstitution and x-ray crystallography.  Of particular interest are the microtubule +TIP proteins that dynamically localize to microtubule plus ends, communicate with the actin network, regulate microtubule dynamics, capture kinetochores and engage the cell cortex under polarity-based cues.

Smith, Spencer L email , publications

My laboratory explores neural circuitry and how it changes moment-to-moment, and over a lifetime, using imaging, electrophysiology, and behavior. The goal of our research is a better understanding of how molecular, cellular, and synaptic mechanisms underlie the function of large-scale brain circuitry. Ultimately, we hope this better understanding may illuminate the mechanisms in complex diseases like autism and schizophrenia, and suggest new therapeutic strategies.

Smithies, Oliver email , publications

Correction of genes with mutant pathologies (gene therapy); construction of animal models of human genetic diseases to facilitate better studies of the resultant pathology and develop new modes of treatment.

Snider, William email , , , , publications

Work in my laboratory is directed at the role of neuronal growth factors in the development and regeneration of axons. We employ sensory neurons of the DRG as a model system. Sensory neurons are unique in elaborating a peripheral axon that regenerates readily after injury and a central axon projecting in the spinal cord that does not. This work is directly relevant to a major NINDS goal of achieving spinal cord repair.

Snoeyink, Jack email , publications

My primary research area is computational geometry, in which one studies the design and analysis of algorithms for geometric computation. Computational geometry finds application in problems from solid modeling, CAD/CAM, computer graphics, molecular biology, data structuring, and robotics, as well as problems from discrete geometry and topology.  Most of my work involves identifying, representing, and exploiting geometric and topological information that permit efficient computation.  My current focus is on applications of computational geometry in Molecular Biology and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Examples of the former include docking and folding problems, and scoring protein structures using Delaunay tetrahedralization.

Sockman, Keith W email , , , , , publications

I study the ultimate and proximate factors controlling flexibility in reproductive behavior. Using songbirds as a system, I use field and laboratory studies to investigate the ecological cues regulating reproductive flexibility, the neural integration of these cues, and the neural mechanisms precipitating adaptive behavioral outcomes. Of particular interest is the study of courtship and mate-choice behavior and how the songbird brain integrates ecological and social information. I am also interested in how the timing of reproduction, reproductive effort, and family planning are controlled. I use high performance liquid chromatography for the measurement of central catecholamines and immunocytochemistry and microscopy for quantifying neuropeptides and the expression of immediate early genes as markers of neural activity.

Sondek, John email , , , , , , publications

Our laboratory studies signal transduction systems controlled by heterotrimeric G proteins as well as Ras-related GTPases using a variety of biophysical, biochemical and cellular techniques. Member of the Molecular & Cellular Biophysics Training Program.

Song, Juan email , , , publications

Our primary research interest is to identify the mechanisms that regulate neural circuit organization and function at distinct stages of adult neurogenesis, and to understand how circuit-level information-processing properties are remodeled by the integration of new neurons into existing circuits and how disregulation of this process may contribute to various neurological and mental disorders. Our long-range goals are to translate general principles governing neural network function into directions relevant for understanding neurological and psychiatric diseases. We are addressing these questions using a combination of cutting-edge technologies and approaches, including optogenetics, high-resolution microscopy, in vitro and in vivo electrophysiology, genetic lineage tracing and molecular biology.

Stafford, Darrel W. email , , , publications

My laboratory at present is working on the vitamin K cycle and vitamin K-dependent proteins.  The enzymes of the vitamin K cycle include, at a minimum two integral membrane proteins, both of which were purified and cloned by my laboratory.  One, the vitamin K epoxide reductase is the target of warfarin for which 40 million prescriptions are written each year in the US alone.  Polymorphisms in this gene are the best example to date of the use of genomics in molecular medicine.  We are also interested in purifying any additional components of this cycle and trying to understand the ~50% of patients whose genotype is not informative about warfarin dose.  In addition, we are interested in the mechanism of how factor VIIa works and the role of the extracellular matrix in coagulation.

Strahl, Brian D. email , , , , , publications

Our laboratory is examining the role of histone post-translational modifications in chromatin structure and function.  Using a combination of molecular biology, genetics and biochemistry, we are determining how a number of modifications to the histone tails (e.g. acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation and ubiquitylation) contribute to the control of gene transcription, DNA repair and replication.

Stuber, Garret email , , , publications

My lab focuses on delineating the neural circuits that mediate motivated behavioral states that are disrupted in diseases such as addiction, schizophrenia, depression, eating disorder and autism spectrum disorders.  Using animal models we employ a range to cutting edge tools and techniques to study neural circuit function.  Advances in the newly emerging fields such as optogenetics and in vivo imaging have now given us unprecedented abilities to control and monitor the activity of genetically defined neural circuit elements in the behaving animal.  Our research will ultimately uncover how genetically defined cell types in the brain orchestrate and control complex motivated behavioral states.

Styblo, Miroslav email , , publications

Dr. Styblo is a biochemist with background in nutritional biochemistry and biochemical toxicology. His research focuses on topics that require expertise in both nutrition and toxicology and typically involve a translational or interdisciplinary approach. His current research projects examine mechanisms and etiology of diseases associated with exposures to environmental toxins with main focus on cancer and diabetes associated with exposure to arsenic (a common drinking water contaminant), and on the role of diet or specific nutrients in prevention of these diseases.

Su, Lishan email , , , , , , , publications

My laboratory studies development and function of the human immune system and human liver, and HIV-1/HCV infection and immuno-pathogenesis.  1. Humanized mouse models to study human hamatopoietic stem cells (HSC), thymus and liver stem cells.   2. FoxP3 and regulatory T (Treg) cells in viral infection and immuno-pathogenesis.  3. Modeling immuno-pathogenesis and immuno-therapy of chronic HIV and HCV.

Su, Maureen A email , , , publications

Our lab is interested in understanding the genetics of autoimmunity using both mouse models and patient samples. Our work is highly translational and aims to have direct relevance to human disease. One of our approaches is to study rare Mendelian autoimmunity syndromes in order to determine the contributions of a particular gene to developing autoimmunity. We have focused on Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy Syndrome Type 1 (APS1 or APECED), a rare condition due to mutations in the Autoimmune Regulator (Aire) gene. We are interested in how Aire promotes tolerance and have utilized both APS1 mouse models and patient samples to study this disease. We are also interested in understanding how dysregulation of the immune system results in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, an autoimmune disease in which beta cells in pancreatic islets are destroyed. We are primarily using patient samples to study how the balance of suppressor of effector arms of the immune system become dysregulated.

Sullivan, Patrick email , , , , , publications

I study complex traits using linkage, association, and genetic epidemiological approaches.  Disorders include schizophrenia (etiology and pharmacogenetics), smoking behavior, and chronic fatigue.

Swanstrom, Ronald email , , , , , , publications

First, we study the complex HIV-1 population that exists within a person.  We use this complexity to ask questions about viral evolution, transmission, compartmentalization, and pathogenesis.  Second, we are exploring the impact of drug resistance on viral fitness and identifying new drug targets in the viral protein processing pathway.  Third, we participate in a collaborative effort to develop an HIV-1 vaccine.  Fourth, we are using mutagenesis to determine the role of RNA secondary structure in viral replication.

Tamayo, Rita email , , , , publications

Our lab studies the mechanisms facultative pathogens use to adapt to disparate and changing extracellular conditions. Our primary interest is in the ability of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, to persist in its native aquatic environment and also flourish in the host intestinal tract. We are addressing key questions about the role of cyclic diguanylate, a signaling molecule unique to and ubiquitous in bacteria, in the physiological adaptations of V. cholerae as it transits from the aquatic environment into a host. In addition, we are identifying and characterizing factors produced by V. cholerae during growth in a biofilm, a determinant of survival in aquatic environments, that contribute to virulence.  I will be accepting rotation students beginning in the winter of 2009.

Tarantino, Lisa M. email , , , , , , , , publications

The Tarantino lab studies addiction and anxiety-related behaviors in mouse models using forward genetic approaches. We are currently studying a chemically-induced mutation in a splice donor site that results in increased novelty- and cocaine-induced locomotor activity and prolonged stress response. We are using RNA-seq to identify splice variants in the brain that differ between mutant and wildtype animals. We are also using measures of initial sensitivity to cocaine in dozens of inbred mouse strains to understand the genetics, biology and pharmacokinetics of acute cocaine response and how initial sensitivity might be related to addiction. Finally, we have just started a project aimed at studying the effects of perinatal exposure to dietary deficiencies on anxiety, depression and stress behaviors in adult offspring. This study utilizes RNA-seq and a unique breeding design to identify parent of origin effects on behavior and gene expression in response to perinatal diet.

Tarran, Robert email , , publications

A critical component of airways innate defense is the thin liquid layer lining airway surfaces, the periciliary liquid (PCL), that provides a low viscosity solution for ciliary beating and acts a lubricant layer for mucus transport. Normal airways appear to be able to sense the PCL volume and adjust ion channel activity accordingly.  The long term goal of this laboratory is to understand how homeostasis of PCL volume occurs in airway epithelia under normal and pathophysiological conditions. Currently, research in the Tarran lab is focused on three main areas: 1) Regulation of epithelial cell function by the extracellular environment, 2) Gender differences in cystic fibrosis lung disease and 3) The effects of cigarette smoke on epithelial airway ion transport.  We utilize cell biological and biochemical techniques coupled with in vivo translational approaches to address these questions.

Tarrant, Teresa K email , , , publications

Current projects focus on Regulators of G protein signaling including G protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) as well as members of the GoLoco family and how these regulatory proteins affect chemokine receptor signaling, leukocyte function and migration, and autoimmune disease phenotypes.   Through genomic research, it has recently been discovered that GPSM3 (member of the GoLoco family) has two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human population that confer protection from RA and four other autoimmune diseases.  We are currently pursuing the mechanism of this protection by examining the function of GPSM3 in monocytes, where it is most highly expressed, and in RA animal models as well as in translational human studies.

Taylor, Anne Marion email , , publications

Local mRNA translation is critical for axon regeneration, synapse formation, and synaptic plasticity. While much of research has focused on local translation in dendrites and in peripheral axons, less is known about local translation in smaller diameter central axons due to the technical difficulty of accessing them. We developed microfluidic technology to allow access to axons, as well as nascent boutons and fully functional boutons. We identified multiple transcripts that are targeted to cortical and hippocampal axons in rat (Taylor et al. J Neurosci 2009). Importantly, this work countered the prevailing view that local mRNA translation does not occur in mature axons. We are actively investigating transcripts in axons that may play a role in establishing proper synaptic connections. We are also using our technology to identify transcripts targeted to axons and boutons in human neurons. These studies are a critical step towards the identification of key genes and signaling molecules during synapse development, axonal regeneration, and proper circuit function.

Taylor, Joan M. email , , , , publications

The goal of our research is to identify signaling mechanisms that contribute to normal and pathophysiological cell growth in the cardiovascular system.  We study cardiac and vascular development as well as heart failure and atherosclerosis.

Thakker, Dhiren email , , , publications

The Thakker Lab’s major research focus is in three related and yet distinct areas: (i) mechanisms of drug absorption/transport across intestinal epithelium, and (ii) Mechanism-based approaches to modulate intestinal tight-junction permeability, and (iii) Optimizing pediatric drug therapy by understanding drug disposition differences between adult and pediatric populations.  Multi-disciplinary approaches are employed in the group with strong emphasis on organic chemistry, cellular biology, and molecular biology.

Thiele, Todd email , , publications

My primary research interests are directed at the neurobiology of alcoholism. To study the central mechanisms involved with neurobiological responses to ethanol, I use both genetic and pharmacological manipulations. There are many factors that may cause an individual to progress from a moderate or social drinker to an alcoholic. In addition to environmental influences, there is growing evidence in both the human and animal literature that genetic factors contribute to alcohol abuse. Furthermore, the risk for developing alcoholism is likely not associated with a single gene, but rather with multiple genes that interact with environmental factors to determine susceptibility for uncontrolled drinking. Some of the questions that my laboratory is currently addressing are: 1) Does central neuropeptide Y (NPY) signaling modulate neurobiological responses to ethanol and ethanol consumption, 2) Do melanocortin peptides modulate ethanol intake? and 3) Does cAMP-dependent kinase (PKA) play a role in voluntary ethanol consumption and/or other effects produced by ethanol?

Thomas, Nancy email , publications

Molecular carcinogenesis, environmental toxicology, research translation, biomarkers

Thompson, Nancy email , , publications

The immune system is a network of interacting biological cells. The molecular events that lead to the activation and regulation of these cells often occur at the cell surface. However, little is known about the arrangement, motions and interactions of the participating cell-surface molecules. To examine these phenomena, we construct model cell membranes on planar supports from purified or synthesized molecules.  Recently developed techniques in laser-based fluorescence microscopy can then be employed to examine the behavior of select fluorescently labeled molecules at or near the supported planar membranes.  This research is significant not only in the basic understanding of the immune system, but also in other areas of cell-cell communication and cell membrane biophysics, in the physics of two-dimensional fluids, and in biotechnology.

Tidwell, Richard R email , , , publications

Dr. Tidwell’s research is focused on the design and synthesis of new drugs for the treatment of AIDS-associated opportunistic infections.  The rationale for design of new drugs is directed at determining the mechanisms of action, antimicrobial activity, and pharmacokinetics of dicationic molecules.  Studies have been initiated to isolate and identify new drug targets from Pneumocystis carinii and Cryptosporidium parvum utilizing molecular modeling and biochemical methods to aid in the determination of new structures.  The role of proteases and imidazoline receptors in the pathogenesis of disease continues to be a major area of research as well as a new prodrug approach for the cationic molecules to allow for much improved bioavailability.

Ting, Jenny email , , , , , , , , , publications

Topics include gene discovery, genomics/proteomics, gene transcription, signal transduction, molecular immunology.  Disease relevant issues include infectious diseases, autoimmune and demyelinating disorders, cancer chemotherapy, gene linkage.

Tisch, Roland email , , , publications

Projects involve the study of cellular and molecular events involved in autoimmunity, and development and application of genetic vaccines to prevent and treat autoimmunity and cancer.

Troester, Melissa email , , , , publications

Dr. Troester’s research focuses on stromal-epithelial interactions, genomics of normal breast tissue, breast cancer microenvironment, and molecular pathology of breast cancer progression. She is a Co-Investigator on the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a resource including breast tumors from thousands of African American women, and she is PI of the Normal Breast Study (NBS), a unique biospecimen resource of normal tissue from women undergoing breast surgery at UNC Hospitals. Dr. Troester has extensive experience in integrating multiple high dimensional data types. She is chair of the Normal Breast Committee for the Cancer Genome Atlas Project where she is leading coordination of histology, copy number, mutation, methylation, mRNA and microRNA expression data. She has more than a decade of experience working with genomic data and molecular biology of breast cancer progression and has published many papers in the area of breast cancer subtypes, breast microenvironment, and stromal-epithelial interactions. She has trained four postdocs, 12 predoctoral students and several undergraduates.

Tropsha, Alexander email , , , , , , , publications

The major area of our research is Biomolecular Informatics, which implies understanding relationships between molecular structures (organic or macromolecular) and their properties (activity or function). We are interested in building validated and predictive quantitative models that relate molecular structure and its biological function using statistical and machine learning approaches. We exploit these models to make verifiable predictions about putative function of untested molecules.

Tzima, Eleni email , , , , , publications

Blood Flow and Endothelial Cell Function. We are interested in how vascular endothelial cells signal and respond to blood flow in the context of cardiovascular disease and tumor progression.

Valdar, William email , , , , publications

We are a quantitative genetics lab interested the relationship between genes and complex disease. Most of our work focuses on developing statistical and computational techniques for the design and analysis of genetic experiments in animal models. This includes, for example: Bayesian hierarchical modeling of gene by drug effects in crosses of inbred mouse strains; statistical methods for identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) in a variety of experimental mouse populations (including the Collaborative Cross); computational methods for optimal design of studies on parent of origin effects; modeling of diet by gene by parentage interactions that affecting psychiatric disease; detection and estimation of genetic effects on phenotypic variability. For more information, visit the lab website.

Vaziri, Cyrus email , , , , , , publications

Our broad long-term goal is to understand how mammalian cells maintain ordered control of DNA replication during normal passage through an unperturbed cell cycle, and in response to genotoxins (DNA-damaging agents).  DNA synthesis is a fundamental process for normal growth and development and accurate replication of DNA is crucial for maintenance of genomic stability.  Many cancers display defects in regulation of DNA synthesis and it is important to understand the molecular basis for aberrant DNA replication in tumors.  Moreover, since many chemotherapies specifically target cells in S-phase, a more detailed understanding of DNA replication could allow the rational design of novel cancer therapeutics.  Our lab focuses on three main aspects of DNA replication control:  (1) The S-phase checkpoint, (2) Trans-Lesion Synthesis (TLS) and (3) Re-replication.

Vilen, Barbara email , , , , , publications

We are interested in understanding how autoreactive B cells become re-activated to secrete autoantibodies that lead to autoimmune disease.  Our research is focused on understanding how signal transduction through the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) and Toll Like Receptors (TLR) lead to secretion of autoantibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE).

Vision, Todd email , , , , , , publications

Our lab uses computational and molecular tools to study the evolution of genome organization, primarily in the flowering plants. Areas of
investigation include the origin and consequences of differences in gene order within populations and between species, the evolutionary and functional diversification of gene families (phytome.org), and the application of genomics to evolutionary model organisms (mimulusevolution.org).  We also are involved in a number of cyberinfrastructure initiatives through the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (nescent.org), including work on digital scientific libraries (datadryad.org), open bioinformatic software development (e.g. gmod.org) and the application of semantic web technologies to biological data integration (phenoscape.org).

Voruganti, Saroja email , , publications

My research interests are focused on understanding the effects of genetic and environmental factors and their interaction on complex human diseases using a combination of statistical, molecular and bioinformatics approaches. My specific interests include understanding the influence of genetic variants on serum uric acid levels (a biomarker for renal-cardiovascular disease), effect of gene by diet interactions on serum uric acid levels and associated renal-cardiovascular disease risk factors and identification of functional variants affecting these disorders that will lead to novel treatment options.

Wan, Yisong email , , , , publications

We are a molecular genetics laboratory studying immune functions by using mouse models. The focus of our research is to investigate the molecular mechanisms of immune responses under normal and pathological conditions. Our goal is to find therapies for various human immune disorders, such as autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis), tumor and cancer, and inflammatory diseases (inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and arthritis).

Wang, Andrew Z. email , , , , publications

My laboratory has two research directions. One is to utilize nanotechnology to develop novel diagnostics and therapeutics to improve cancer treatment. The other is to use techniques developed in tissue engineering to develop in vitro 3D models of cancer metastasis.

Wang, Greg Gang email , , , , publications

With an emphasis on chromatin biology and cancer epigenetics, our group focuses on mechanistic understandings of how chemical modifications of chromatin define distinct patterns of human genome, control gene expression, and regulate cell proliferation versus differentiation during development, and how their deregulations lead to oncogenesis. Multiple on-going projects employ modern biological technologies to: 1) biochemically isolate and characterize novel factors that bind to histone methylation on chromatin, 2) examine the role of epigenetic factors (chromatin-modifying enzymes and chromatin-associated factors) during development and tumorigenesis using mouse knockout models, 3) analyze epigenomic and transcriptome alternation in cancer versus normal cells utilizing next-generation sequencing technologies, 4) identify novel oncogenic or tumor suppressor genes associated with leukemia and lymphoma using shRNA library-based screening. We are also working together with UNC Center of Drug Discovery to develop small-molecule inhibitors for chromatin-associated factors as novel targeted cancer therapies.

Wang, Wei email , , publications

The Wang group designs novel data models and algorithms to address fundamental computational issues in analyzing large sets of experimental data. Ongoing research projects include: 1) Classification and clustering analysis of gene-expression profiles, 2) Discovery of discriminative structural motifs in proteins and 3) Query and integration of heterogeneous databases.

Wang, Zefeng email , , , , , , publications

To understand the general rules of splicing regulation, a.k.a. splicing code”

Waters, Marcey email , , publications

Our research focuses on several different aspects of biomolecular recognition, including (1) protein post-translational modifications, (2) protein-nucleic acid interactions, and (3) protein-protein interactions that are important in a number of different biological areas, including epigenetics and cancer.  We use bio-organic chemistry combined with peptide design and biophysical chemistry to study these interactions and to develop new tools for inhibition and/or sensing of these biomolecular interactions.

Watkins, Paul email , publications

Mechanistic toxicology, hepato-toxicology, research translation, biomarkers

Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer email , , publications

A goal of the laboratory is to understand viral molecular pathogenesis in the oral cavity. We seek to understand the critical molecular interactions that occur between DNA viruses and the host that govern the development of oral disease.

Weeks, Kevin email , , , , , , publications

The Weeks group invents novel chemical microscopes for understanding the structure and function of RNA and then applies these technologies to leading, and previously intractable, problems in biology. Most projects in the laboratory span fundamental chemistry or technology development and ultimately lead to practical applications in virology (especially HIV), next-generation structure analysis, drug design, and understanding RNA structure in living cells.  Collectively, this work has led to extensive recognition of graduate student colleagues in the laboratory.

Weinberg, Richard email , , , publications

I’m a neurobiologist who uses immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy to address functional questions. I am trying to elucidate the molecular organization of synaptic signaling in the rodent neocortex, hippocampus, and striatum. I’m also interested in the actin cytoskeleton of dendritic spines, and how spines may remodel during LTP.

Weiss, Ellen email , , , , , , publications

The vertebrate retina is an extension of the central nervous system that controls visual signaling and circadian rhythm.  Our laboratory is interested in how the retina adapts to changing light intensities in the natural environment.  We are presently studying the regulation of 2 G protein-coupled receptor kinases, GRK1 and GRK7, that participate in signal termination in the light-detecting cells of the retina, the rods and cones.  Signal termination helps these cells recover from light exposure and adapt to continually changing light intensities.  Recently, we determined that GRK1 and GRK7 are phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA).  Since cAMP levels are regulated by light in the retina, phosphorylation by PKA may be important in recovery and adaptation.  Biochemical and molecular approaches are used in 2 model organisms, mouse and zebrafish, to address the role of PKA in retina function. Keywords:  cAMP, cone, G protein-coupled receptor, GPCR, GRK, kinase, neurobiology, opsin, PKA, retina, rhodopsin rod, second messenger, signal transduction, vision.

Weissman, Bernard E. email , , , , , publications

How the loss of different components of the SWI/SNF complex contributes to neoplastic transformation remains an open and important question. My laboratory concentrates on addressing this question by the combined use of biological, biochemical and mouse models for SWI/SNF complex function.

Whang, Young E. email , , , , publications

My laboratory is interested in characterizing the role of cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways in regulation of androgen receptor activity and progression of prostate cancer.  Our studies have focused on HER-2 receptor tyrosine kinase and we have demonstrated that HER-2 activation stimulates androgen receptor activity and HER-2 inhibition inhibits androgen receptor transcriptional function at the level of recruitment to the androgen responsive enhancers.  These findings have led to the design and initiation of the protocol involving lapatinib, a clinical HER-2 inhibitor, in treatment of patients with prostate cancer.  More recently, we have demonstrated that activated Cdc42-associated kinase Ack1 promotes progression of prostate cancer via tyrosine phosphorylation of androgen receptor at Tyr-267 and Tyr-363 residues.  We are interested in further characterizing the role of tyrosine phosphorylation of androgen receptor in prostate cancer and development of Ack1 targeted therapy for clinical use.

Whinna, Herbert C. email , publications

Construction of chimeric antithrombotic proteins targeted to endothelial cell surfaces; Activity of these using in vitro assays and in vivo mouse models of arterial and venous thrombosis; pathophysiology of hemostasis/thrombosis in these mouse models.

White, Peter email , , publications

My research interests are wide ranging, including topics in conservation biology and plant ecology.  I have had several foci: species richness (including the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, beta diversity (including the comparison of diversity in different parts of the world that have similar climates and the connections to coinservation planning),and  the ecology of natural disturbances (including connections to environmental ethics and conservation of biodiversity).  Through my role as Director of the University’s North Carolina Botanical Garden, a conservation focused garden, I am also involved in research and poliy in invasive species biology, ecological restoration, ex situ conservation and reintroduction of rare species, and related subjects.

Whitmire, Jason email , , publications

The Whitmire lab investigates how the adaptive immune system protects against virus infection.  The research is focused on understanding the mechanisms by which interferons, cytokines, and other accessory molecules regulate T cell numbers and functions following acute and chronic virus infections.  The goal is to identify and characterize the processes that differentiate memory T cells in vivo. The long-term objective is to develop strategies that improve vaccines against infectious diseases by manipulating these pathways.

Wightman, R. Mark email , , , , , publications

Neurochemistry of dopamine, dopamine and behavior, exocytosis from single cells.

Wilhelmsen, Kirk email , , , , publications

The Wilhelmsen lab is engaged in the genetic mapping of susceptibility loci for complex neurological diseases and has been developing large-scale automated gene mapping technologies to facilitate these mapping efforts. They have invested heavily in automation that enables high-throughput genotyping and data processing. As data accumulates, this will enable parametric and nonparametric linkage analysis of large numbers of traits at regular intervals for the entire genome. The Wilhelmsen lab is applying these techniques to two projects: (1) the genetics of alcoholism and (2) positional cloning of the gene responsible for a family of disorders called frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17).

Willett, Christopher email , , , , publications

My lab concentrates on studying the molecular genetic basis of the evolutionary processes of adaptation and speciation. The questions we ask are what are the sequence changes that lead to variation between species and diversity within species, and what can these changes tell us about the processes that lead to their evolution. We use a number of different techniques to answer these questions, including molecular biology, sequence analyses (i.e. population genetics and molecular evolution techniques), physiological studies, and examinations of whole-organism fitness. Currently work in the lab has focused on a intertidal copepod species that is an excellent model for the initial stages of speciation (and also provides opportunities to study how populations of this species adapt to their physical environment).

Williams, Carmen J. email , , , , publications

Reproductive biology of early mammalian embryogenesis including gametogenesis, fertilization, and preimplantation embryo development. Effects of environmental disrupting chemicals on female reproductive tract development and function, with a focus on epigenetic alterations.

Williams, David C. Jr. email , , , , publications

The overall objective of our research is to understand the connection between structure of protein-DNA complexes, protein dynamics and function.  We currently focus on the methyl-cytosine binding domain (MBD) family of DNA binding proteins.  The MBD proteins selectively recognize methylated CpG dinucleotides and regulate gene expression critical for both normal development and carcinogenesis.  We use a combination of NMR spectroscopy and biophysical analyses to study protein-DNA and protein-protein complexes involving the MBD proteins.  Building on these studies, we are developing inhibitors of complex formation as potential molecular therapeutics for b-hemoglobinopathies and cancer.

Williams, Scott E email , , , , , , , publications

Divisions and decisions in development and disease. The mammalian skin epithelium is an ideal model system to study fundamental questions in stem cell and cancer biology. It is accessible; it can be cultured, genetically manipulated and transplanted; and its resident stem cells possess unparalleled regenerative capacity. Our skin, unlike many other organs, undergoes continuous growth and turnover. In development and homeostasis, progenitors in the skin must balance self-renewal and differentiation programs. We have found that asymmetric cell divisions are a critical mechanism by which skin progenitors maintain this equilibrium. We are interested in studying how this asymmetry is controlled at a molecular level, and how division orientation impacts cell fate choices in normal and neoplastic growth. To facilitate these and other studies in diverse epithelia, we have developed a powerful functional tool, lentiviral in vivo RNAi, which allows us to rapidly perform functional studies on any gene in the intact mouse in weeks instead of years. Our broad goal will be to use this technique, in combinations of candidate and screening approaches, to dissect pathways that influence stem cell differentiation. I will be joining the Pathology Department in April, 2013 and am seeking passionate, open-minded, and interactive students for the summer and beyond.

Willis, Monte S. email , , , , publications

We are looking for talented and motivated individuals to join our research team. Dr. Willis’s lab investigates the molecular basis of genetic and lifestyle mediated cardiomyopathic disease (heart failure) using bioinformatics, molecular, and animal model approaches. We are seeking graduate students looking for an exciting and supportive research environment offering a diversity of experiences integrating cardiac phenotyping, mouse models of disease, molecular biology, and ubiquitin proteasome biology. Both national and international training experiences supported by the Leducq Foundation (http://fondationleducq.org/network/proteotoxicity-an-unappreciated-mechanism-of-heart-disease-and-its-potential-for-novel-therapeutics/) are possible,  depending on citizenship and interest in travel.

Wilson, Elizabeth M email , , , , , publications

Our research focus is on mechanisms of action of the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent transcriptional regulatory protein that mediates the effects of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Studies seek to identify and characterize AR coregulatory proteins and their regulation by phosphorylation and the cell cycle. Areas of interest include male sex development, the androgen insensitivity syndrome, and AR action in the ovary, endometrium and prostate cancer. Melanoma antigen gene protein-11 (MAGE-11) was identified as an AR coregulatory protein that belongs to the MAGE gene family of cancer-germline antigens. The MAGE-11 gene is located on the human X chromosome and is exclusively expressed in human and nonhuman primates, providing a gain-of- function to AR. Mechanisms whereby MAGE-11 regulates AR transcriptional activity through its interaction with the AR NH2-terminal FXXLF motif and cell cycle regulatory proteins are being investigated. Our objective is to understand how AR regulates gene transcription and cell proliferation in the human male and female reproductive tracts.  Keywords:  androgen receptor, MAGE-11, male reproduction, female reproduction, prostate cancer, transcription regulation, FXXLF motifs

Wolberg, Alisa email , , , , publications

We investigate cellular, molecular, and biochemical mechanisms of blood coagulation.  Using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models, we focus on mechanisms contributing to cardiovascular disease (heart attack, stroke, deep vein thrombosis), including the effects of plasma proteins, cells, and blood flow (shear) on blood clot biochemical and mechanical stability.  We have shown that abnormalities in blood protein and/or cellular function contribute to bleeding and clotting pathologies including hemophilia and thrombosis, and shown how hemostatic and antithrombotic therapeutics modulate clot quality.  Current efforts are focused on pathophysiologic mechanisms that result in bleeding or prothrombotic disease (e.g., cancer).  Our overall goal is to translate this knowledge into novel approaches for treating bleeding and clotting disorders.

Wolf, Douglas C. email , publications

Chemical Carcinogenesis.

Wolfenden, Richard email , , publications

Enzymes allow organisms to channel the flow of matter to their own advantage, allowing some reactions to proceed rapidly compared with other reactions that offer no selective advantage to the organism. After a substrate is bound at an enzyme’s active site, its half-life is usually a small fraction of 1 s. Rapid turnover is necessary if any enzyme is to produce a significant rate of reaction at the limited concentration (<10(-5) M) at which enzymes are present within the cell. Many enzymes are known to have evolved to work nearly as efficiently as is physically possible, with second order rate constants that approach their rates of encounter (10(9) M(-1)s(-1) with the substrate in solution. How rapidly would biological reactions occur if an enzyme were not present? Until recently, some reactions were known to require several years, and everyday experience suggests that some reactions are slower still. The survival of paper documents and ancient ships for long periods under water implies that the glycosidic bonds of cellulose, for example, are very resistant to hydrolysis in the absence of cellulases that catalyze their hydrolysis. Why would one wish to know the rate of a biological reaction in the absence of an enzyme? That information would allow biologists to appreciate what natural selection has accomplished in the evolution of enzymes as proficient catalysts and would enable chemists to compare enzymes with artificial catalysts produced in the laboratory. Such information would also be of value in considering the design of enzyme antagonists: the greater the rate enhancement that an enzyme produces, the greater is its affinity for the altered substrate in the transition state compared with its relatively modest affinity for the substrate in the ground state. That principle has furnished a basis for the design of transition state analogues, extremely powerful inhibitors that resemble the transition state and take advantage of that special affinity. Examples have now been discovered for enzymes of every class, including inhibitors that are already used to control hypertension, the spread of HIV, the maturation of insects and the growth of weeds. By allowing snapshots of enzymes in action, transition state analogues have also provided valuable tools for investigating enzyme structures and mechanisms, most recently that of the peptide bond forming center of the ribosome. Those enzymes that produce the largest rate enhancements and transition state affinities should offer the most sensitive targets for inhibitor design. Particularly remarkable are those enzymes that act as simple protein catalysts, without the assistance of metals or other cofactors. To determine the extent to which one such enzyme, human uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase, enhances the rate of substrate decarboxylation; we examined the rate of spontaneous decarboxylation of pyrrolyl-3-acetate. Extrapolation of first-order rate constants measured at elevated temperatures indicates that this reaction proceeds with a half-life of 2.3 x 10(9) years, approaching the age of the Earth. This enzyme shows no significant structural or sequence homology with yeast orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase, another cofactorless enzyme that catalyzes a very slow reaction. To uncover the mechanisms of action of these remarkable molecules, we are studying these and other enzymes by kinetic and structural methods, site-directed mutation and the study of model reactions. In addition to more traditional methods, these projects make extensive use of new methods that include high-field NMR, isothermal calorimetry, and kinetic experiments in water and other solvents in sealed tubes at very high temperatures.

Wolfgang, Matthew C. email , , , , , publications

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen responsible for a variety of diseases in individuals with compromised immune function. Dr. Wolfgang’s research focuses on the pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.  The goal of his research is to understand how this opportunistic pathogen coordinates the expression of virulence factors in response to the host environment. Projects in his laboratory focus on the regulation of intracellular cyclic AMP, a second messenger signaling molecule that regulates P. aeruginosa virulence. Dr. Wolfgang’s laboratory uses a combination of molecular genetics and biochemical approaches to understand how P. aeruginosa controls the synthesis, degradation and transport of cAMP in response to extracellular cues. Other related projects focus on the regulation and function of P. aeruginosa Type IV pili (TFP). TFP are cAMP regulated surface organelles that are critical for bacterial colonization of human mucosal tissue. In addition, the Wolfgang lab is actively involved in characterizing the lung microbiome of patients with chronic airway diseases and studying the interactions between P. aeruginosa and other bacterial species during mixed infections.

Wright, Fred email , publications

Statistical genetics, bioinformatics, likelihood- based inference

Wright, J. Timothy email , , , , publications

The Wright laboratory research is focused primarily on defining the phenotype and genotype relationships in a variety of craniofacial conditions such as amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta, ectodermal dysplasias, and the tricho-dento-osseous syndrome.  This is accomplished through a combination of human gene discovery approaches, the use of transgenic mice, and cell culture systems to explore mechanisms that explain genotype-phenotype relationships.  His most recent research includes investigation of the molecular controls of tooth formation as well as gene expression in tumorigenesis involving  odontogenic tumors such as ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

Xiao, Xiao email , , , , publications

Xiao lab is interested in molecular medicine, specifically, gene delivery and therapy for various genetic and acquired diseases. The lab genetically engineers a non-pathogenic and defective DNA virus, named adeno-associate virus (AAV). The engineered AAV has all of its own genes gutted and replaced by our own genes of interests. As a result, the 22-nanometer AAV particles now serve as tiny FedEx/UPS trucks to deliver therapeutic genes to a variety of cells, tissues and even the whole body. Besides its superb efficiency, AAV also offers an excellent safety profile. For example, Xiao lab has developed AAV vectors to treat diseases like muscular dystrophies, heart failure, diabetes, arthritis, hepatitis and cancer, etc. A first of its kind gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a lethal childhood genetic disease, is in a phase I clinical trial.  In addition to gene delivery for therapeutic purposes, AAV can also be used as a powerful tool to study basic biology such as molecular genetics, signal transduction, apoptosis, mechanisms of pathogenesis and even the engineering of animal models. For example, AAV vectors can be used to deliver protein-encoding genes, antisense RNA, small interference RNA (siRNA) or microRNA to tissues like the muscle, heart, liver, pancreas, kidney, lung, brain and spinal cord, etc., to over-express, up-regulate or knockdown a gene or multiple genes for the purposes of dissecting particular molecular pathways, biological functions and immunology consequences and even creating disease models.

Xiong, Yue email , , , , , publications

Using genetic, cell biology, biochemical and proteomic approaches to determine the function and mechanism of – (1) CDK inhibitors in development and tumor suppression, (2) the p53 degradation and transport, and (3) RING family of ubiquitin ligases.

Yeh, Elaine email , , , publications

The site of microtubule attachment to the chromosome is the kinetochore, a complex of over 60 proteins assembled at a specific site on the chromosome, the centromere. Almost every kinetochore protein identified in yeast is conserved through humans and the organization of the kinetochore in yeast may serve as the fundamental unit of attachment. More recently we have become interested in the role of two different classes of ATP binding proteins, cohesions (Smc3, Scc1) and chromatin remodeling factors (Cac1, Hir1, Rdh54) in the structural organization of the kinetochore and their contribution to the fidelity of chromosome segregation.

Yeh, Jen Jen email , , , , publications

We are a translational research lab. The overall goal of our research is to find therapeutic targets and biomarkers for patients with pancreatic and colorectal cancer and to translate this to the clinic. In order to accomplish this, we analyze patient tumors using microarray analysis, identify and validate targets using forward and reverse genetic approaches in both cell lines and mouse models. At the same time, we evaluate novel therapeutics for promising targets in mouse models in order to better predict clinical response in humans. We also collaborate with the DeSimone and Huang labs to apply nanotechnology to drug delivery and therapeutics. Keywords: genomics, biomarkers, translational research, microarray, signaling, pancreatic cancer, colon cancer, mouse models, GEMM, drug discovery, nanoparticles.

Zhang, Qi email , , , , publications

Our laboratory is focusing on developing and applying solution-state NMR methods, together with computational and biochemical approaches, to understand the molecular basis of nucleic acid functions that range from enzymatic catalysis to gene regulation. In particular, we aim to visualize, with atomic resolution, the entire dynamic processes of ribozyme catalysis, riboswitch-based gene regulation, and co-transciptional folding of mRNA. The principles deduced from these studies will provide atomic basis for rational manipulation of RNA catalysis and folding, and for de novo design of small molecules that target specific RNA signals. Research program in the laboratory provides diverse training opportunities in areas of spectroscopy, biophysics, structural biology, computational modeling, and biochemistry.

Zhang, Qing email , , , , publications

The oxygen-sensing pathway contributes largely to the development of tumors. One of the central players in this pathway is prolyl hydroxylase (EglN1, 2 and 3). Our lab currently studies hypoxia signaling, prolyl hydroxylase and cancer, specifically breast and renal cell carcinoma. One project focuses on using proteomic and genomic approaches to screen for novel prolyl hydroxylase substrates that play important roles in cancer. The other project involves integrating CHIP-seq strategy with gene expression profiling in order to identify EglN2 prolyl hydroxylase and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) targets in the malignant diseases. The ultimate goal is to understand mechanistically how oxygen-sensing pathways contribute to cancer progression, which will facilitate our design of efficient treatment strategies to specifically target cancer.

Zhang, Qisheng email , , , , publications

Our lab studies lipid signaling pathways that are involved in development and diseases by developing novel chemical probes and technologies. As key components of cellular membranes, lipids also serve as signaling molecules and modify functions of proteins through either covalent or non-covalent interactions. Dys-regulation of lipid signaling has been correlated with various diseases including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Consequently, many lipid-related proteins or processes have been used as therapeutic targets. However, lipids are dynamically metabolized and transported, making it difficult to illustrate the roles of lipids in development and diseases with limited availability of probes and technologies for lipid studies. The active projects in the lab include: 1) develop novel technologies to synthesize complex lipids, particularly phosphatidylinositides, and identify their interacting proteins in live cells; 2) develop new small molecule sensors and inhibitors for lipid metabolic enzymes such as PI3K and PLC; and 3) investigate cellular functions of lipids on different processes, particularly those regulated by small GTPases.

Zhang, Yanping email , , , , , publications

We employ modern technologies – genomics, proteomics, mouse models, multi-color digital imaging, etc. to study cancer mechanisms. We have made major contributions to our understanding of the tumor suppressor ARF and p53 and the oncoprotein Mdm2.

Zou, Fei email , , publications

My research has been concentrated on the areas of statistical genetics and genomics to investigate the role of genetic variations on complex quantitative traits and diseases. I work primarily in the development, as well as the examination of statistical properties, of theoretical methodologies appropriate for the interpretation of genetic data.

Zylka, Mark J. email , , , , , , publications

Our research is focused on two general areas:  1. Autism and 2. Pain.  Our autism research is focused on topoisomerases and other transcriptional regulators that were recently linked to autism.  We use genome-wide approaches to better understand how these transcriptional regulators affect gene expression in developing and adult neurons (such as RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, Crispr/Cas9 for knocking out genes).  We also assess how synaptic function is affected, using calcium imaging and electrophysiology.   In addition, we are performing a large RNA-seq screen to identify chemicals and drugs that increase risk for autism.   /  / Our pain research is focused on lipid kinases that regulate pain signaling and sensitization.  This includes work with cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, molecular biology and behavioral models of chronic pain.  We also are working on drug discovery projects, with an eye towards developing new therapeutics for chronic pain.