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NameEmailPhD ProgramResearch InterestPublications
Webb, Julia

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Genomics

Smyers, Nate

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biophysics, Computational Biology, Drug Discovery

Lobanov, Alec

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Computational Biology, Genomics

Kelestemur, Enes

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biochemistry, Computational Biology, Systems Biology

Hamilton, Nolan

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Genetics

Gillman, Madeline

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Computational Biology, Toxicology

Daigle, Austin

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Computational Biology, Evolutionary Biology, Genomics

Augoustides, Victoria

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Chemical Biology, Computational Biology, Drug Delivery

Nazockdast, Ehssan
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Applied Physical Sciences

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biomaterials, Biophysics, Cell Biology, Computational Biology

We are interested in the physics of soft and squishy materials, especially the organization and mechanics of living cellular materials. We use theory and simulation in close collaboration with experiments to understand the complex structural and mechanical behavior of these systems. These questions and our approach to them are interdisciplinary and intersect several traditional fields, including cell biology, biophysics, fluid dynamics and applied mathematics.

Superfine, Richard
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Applied Physical Sciences, Biomedical Engineering

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biomaterials, Biophysics, Cell Biology, Computational Biology, Systems Biology

Superfine’s group studies stimulus-responsive active and living materials from the scale of individual molecules to physiological tissues, including DNA, cells and microfluidic-based tissue models. We develop new techniques using advanced optical, scanning probe, and magnetic force microscopy. We pursue diverse physiological phenomena from cancer to immunology to mucus clearance in the lung. Our work includes developing systems that mimic biology, most recently in the form of engineered cilia arrays that mimic lung tissue while providing unique solutions in biomedical devices.