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NameEmailPhD ProgramResearch InterestPublications
Davis, Harris

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biophysics, Computational Biology, Pharmacology

“My goal for my PhD is to build mathematical, biophysical models of G-protein and GPCR pharmacology. I want to use molecular dynamics and machine learning to inform ODE and PDE models that are testable experimentally. Hopefully, this will lead to more robust predictions of the effects of G-protein targeting drugs. I’m specifically interested in modeling allostery and biased signaling, especially at and downstream of the human serotonin and opioid receptors.”

Cherry, Kendall

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biophysics, Chemical Biology, Computational Biology

“I’m primarily interested in using applying computational and experimental approaches to study macromolecule structure, dynamics, and function. Coming from drug discovery research, I know how much of an asset protein structures are in rationally designing drugs. I am interested in studying systems or creating tools that can be used in a wide variety of applications. However, I am open to other areas of study as well!”

Campillo Minano, Beatriz

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Genetics

“I am interested in developing computational methods and algorithms for solving biological questions. I would like to focus on machine-learning approaches for genetics or structural biology. I am also interested in the development of this approaches as software tools or pipelines to ensure their generalizable usage”

Bonanno, Maddie

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Computational Biology, Genetics

“I hope to pursue research in computational biology: I want to leverage computer science and computational tools to investigate novel questions in biomedicine. My major interests lie in non-communicable diseases (including acute injuries like TBI), chronic pain, gene-environment interactions, genetic variation, and chronic illness. I’d love to explore any of the above topics through computational drug discovery, machine learning, genome-wide association studies, etc. My research interests are computational in nature, but I am not opposed to incorporating a wet lab component.”

Addish, Sumaya

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biochemistry, Cell Signaling, Computational Biology, Developmental Biology

“I am interested in how perturbations in cell signaling contribute to developmental and genetic disorders. In graduate school, I would like to explore this at the intersection of biochemistry, developmental biology, and regeneration while understanding the mechanisms of disease processes.”

Schrank, Travis

EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Pathobiology & Translational Science

RESEARCH INTEREST
Bioinformatics, Biophysics, Cancer Biology, Cancer Signaling & Biochemistry, Chemical Biology, Computational Biology, Evolutionary Biology, Genetics, Genomics, Molecular Biology, Molecular Mechanisms of Disease, Translational Medicine, Virology

I am a surgeon-scientist specialized in head and neck cancers. My goal is to address translationalquestions with genomic data and bioinformatic methods, as well as benchtop experimentation. My clinical practice as a head and neck cancer surgeon also influences my research by helping me seek solutions to problems that will directly inform gaps in the current treatment protocols.

I have developed a strong interest in HPV genomics as well as HPV/host genome integrations, as these factors are intrinsically related to transcriptional diversity and patient outcomes in HPV-associated head and neck cancers. Our work has helped to demonstrate that a novel mechanism of HPV-mediated oncogenesis requiring NF-kB activation is present in nearly 50% of oropharyngeal tumors. In this vein, we are aggressively investigating the cellular interplay between the NF-kB pathway and persistent HPV infection, tumor radiation response, NRF2 signaling, and more.

Another outgrowth of this work has been investigating APOBEC3B and its non-canonical roles in regulating transcription. Our preliminary work has demonstrated that APOBEC3B has surprisingly strong transcriptional effects in HPV+ HNSCC cells and may promote oncogenesis and tumor maintenance by suppressing the innate immune response and influencing the HPV viral lifecycle.

Our group also have a strong interest in translational genomic studies. Our group is working to develop methods that will make gene expression-based biomarkers more successful in the clinic, as well as studying many aspects of genomic alterations that contribute to the development of squamous cell carcinomas.

Yang, En
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Applied Physical Sciences, Biology, Neuroscience

RESEARCH INTEREST
Brain Development, Computational Biology, Microscopy/Imaging, Neurobiology, Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Neuropharmacology, Quantitative Biology

The EnYang Lab explores interdisciplinary fields to unravel the intricate workings of neural networks within the brain, focusing on how they execute computations, foster imagination, and respond to emotional states. Using larval zebrafish as an animal model, the lab observes, decodes, and perturbs the entire neural networks at single-cell resolution during cognitive tasks. Through the integration of whole-brain imaging, brain-machine interface (BMI), Virtual Reality, optogenetic manipulation, deep learning, and other modern technologies, the lab aims to decipher cognitive abilities in the brain and translate findings into engineering solutions, potentially impacting fields like learning disorders and psychiatric management.

Chung, Kay
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Cell Biology & Physiology

RESEARCH INTEREST
Bioinformatics, Cancer Biology, Cancer Immunology, Cancer Signaling & Biochemistry, Chemical Biology, Computational Biology, Gene Therapy, Immunology, Molecular Biology, Signal Transduction, Systems Biology, Translational Medicine, Virology

The Chung lab is engineering immune cells, particularly T cells, to achieve maximum therapeutic efficacy at the right place and timing. We explore the crossroads of synthetic biology, immunology, and cancer biology. Particularly, we are employing protein engineering, next-gen sequencing, CRISPR screening, and bioinformatics to achieve our objectives:

(1) Combinatorial recipes of transcription factors for T cell programming.

(2) Technologies for temporal regulation and/or rewiring of tumor and immune signal activation (chemokine, nuclear, inhibitor receptors).

(3) Synthetic oncolytic virus for engineering tumor-T cell crosstalk.

Miao, Yinglong
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Pharmacology

RESEARCH INTEREST
Aging/Alzheimer's, Biochemistry, Biophysics, Cardiovascular Disease, Computational Biology, Drug Discovery, Pharmacology, Signal Transduction

Our research is focused on the development of novel theoretical and computational methods and AI techniques, which greatly enhance computer simulations and facilitate simulation analysis, and the application of these methods, making unprecedented contributions to biomolecular modeling and drug discovery. In collaboration with leading experimental groups, we combine complementary simulations and experiments to uncover functional mechanisms and design drugs of important biomolecules, including G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), membrane-embedded proteases, RNA-binding proteins, and RNA. At the interface of computational biology, chemistry, biophysics, bioinformatics and pharmacology, our research aims to address three major topics: (i) development of biomolecular enhanced sampling and AI techniques, (ii) multiscale computational modeling of critical cellular signaling pathways, and (iii) AI-driven drug discovery of medically important proteins and RNA for treatments of neurological disorders, heart failure and cancers.

Leiderman, Karin
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Biochemistry & Biophysics, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biophysics, Cardiovascular Biology, Cell Signaling, Computational Biology, Enzymology, Hematology, Pharmacology, Quantitative Biology, Systems Biology

I am a mathematical biologist interested in the biochemical and biophysical aspects of blood clotting and emergent behavior in biological fluid-structure interaction problems. I especially love mathematical modeling, where creativity, biological knowledge, and mathematical insight meet. My goal is to use mathematical and computational modeling as a tool to learn something new about a biological system, not just to simply match model output to experimental data. My research paradigm includes an integration of mathematical and experimental approaches, together with statistical analyses and inference, to determine mechanisms underlying complex biological phenomena. This paradigm culminates in the contextualization of my findings to both the mathematical and biological communities. My research program is focused mainly on studying the influence of biochemical and biophysical mechanisms on blood coagulation, clot formation, and bleeding.