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NameEmailPhD ProgramResearch InterestPublications
Nazockdast, Ehssan
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Applied Physical Sciences

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biomaterials, Biophysics, Cell Biology, Computational Biology

We are interested in the physics of soft and squishy materials, especially the organization and mechanics of living cellular materials. We use theory and simulation in close collaboration with experiments to understand the complex structural and mechanical behavior of these systems. These questions and our approach to them are interdisciplinary and intersect several traditional fields, including cell biology, biophysics, fluid dynamics and applied mathematics.

Freeman, Ronit
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Applied Physical Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, Chemistry

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biomaterials, Biophysics, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Cell Signaling, Drug Delivery, Drug Discovery, Nanomedicine, Translational Medicine

My lab focuses on developing bioinspired molecular constructs and material platforms that can mimic proteins and be programmed to respond to stimuli resulting from biomolecular recognition. Major efforts are directed to design peptide- and nucleic acid-based scaffolds or injectable nanostructures to create artificial extracellular matrices that can directly signal cells.

Superfine, Richard
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Applied Physical Sciences, Biomedical Engineering

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biomaterials, Biophysics, Cell Biology, Computational Biology, Systems Biology

Superfine’s group studies stimulus-responsive active and living materials from the scale of individual molecules to physiological tissues, including DNA, cells and microfluidic-based tissue models. We develop new techniques using advanced optical, scanning probe, and magnetic force microscopy. We pursue diverse physiological phenomena from cancer to immunology to mucus clearance in the lung. Our work includes developing systems that mimic biology, most recently in the form of engineered cilia arrays that mimic lung tissue while providing unique solutions in biomedical devices.

Thaxton, Jessica
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Cell Biology & Physiology

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology, Metabolism

The Thaxton laboratory studies the intersection of stress and metabolism in immune cells for applications in cancer immunotherapy. Our pursuits center around the biology of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We aim to define how stress on the ER defines changes in protein homeostasis, metabolic fate, and antitumor efficacy of immune subsets in human tumors. In order to pursue our goals we collaborate vigorously with clinicians, creating a highly translational platform to expand our discoveries. Moreover, we design unique mouse models and use innovate technologies such as metabolic tracing, RNA-sequencing, and spectral flow cytometry to study how the stress of solid tumors impacts immune function. Ultimately, we aim to discover new ways to restore immune function in solid tumors to offer unique therapies for cancer patients.

Babaki, Daniel

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cell Biology, Cell Signaling, Developmental Biology

Coke, Addie

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cell Biology, Evolutionary Biology, Molecular Biology

Daglish, Sabrina

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Cell Signaling, Drug Discovery

Hsu, Sherry

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Neurobiology

Mason, Kayla

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cell Biology, Developmental Biology, Immunology

Morrison-Welch, Nik

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cell Biology, Immunology, Toxicology