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NameEmailPhD ProgramResearch InterestPublications
Chen, Jiakun
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Biology, Cell Biology & Physiology, Neuroscience

RESEARCH INTEREST
Brain Development, Cell Biology, Developmental Biology, Genetics, Model Organisms, Neurobiology, Neurodevelopmental Disorders

The goal of our research is to understand how astrocytes develop and how they interact with neural elements during nervous system formation, function, and maintenance. Our lab uses fruit fly Drosophila and zebrafish Danio rerio to explore fundamental aspects of astrocyte biology. We leverage the powerful genetics and unparalleled molecular toolsets in flies to uncover gene function, and we exploit the advanced live-imaging techniques in zebrafish to study astrocyte-neuron interactions in vivo.

Girault, Jessica
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Neuroscience

RESEARCH INTEREST
Behavior, Brain Development, Genetics, Neurodevelopmental Disorders

We are a lab using state-of-the art neuroimaging techniques to study brain development and its links to emerging cognition and behavior in young infants and children. We study both typically developing infants and those at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorder. We are particularly interested in how family study designs can help us understand genetic influences on brain development.

Liu, Qingyun

EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Genetics & Molecular Biology

RESEARCH INTEREST
Bacteriology, Bioinformatics, Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Genetics, Genomics, Microscopy/Imaging, Molecular Biology, Molecular Mechanisms of Disease, Pathogenesis & Infection

Traditionally, basic science has sought to enter the translational pipeline through what can be referred to as “Bottom-Up” science, that is, studies that start with a hypothesis in the lab and aim to develop clinical relevance of the findings. In some cases, notably in conventional antibiotic development, this has worked well – but it assumes one-size fits all solutions that are only as good as our assumptions about the biology of many infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. By contrast, my research focuses on a “Top-Down” approach, leveraging the power of bacterial population genomics to identify bacterial processes important for Mtb success in people and to then employ cutting-edge experimental techniques to mechanistically dissect these processes with the goal of leveraging them using new translational tools.

In my work to date, I have applied this “Top-Down” strategy to define bacterial determinants of treatment outcomes and transmission success, as evident in first-author/corresponding author publications in prestigious journals such as Science, Nature Ecology Evolution, Cell Host Microbe, Science Advances, Genome Biology, PNAS, etc. My work combines expertise in evolutionary biology and bacterial genomics, cutting-edge bacterial genetics and high-throughput experimental phenotyping.

In my own lab, I will use these tools to (1) define the biological mechanisms that enable Mtb to survive antibiotic treatment; (2) identify bacterial determinants of TB transmission success; and (3) elucidate the evolutionary mechanisms underlying the emergence of new bacterial pathogens.

Burns, Ella

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cell Biology, Genetics, Physiology

“I am interested in studying the pathogenesis of muco-obstructive lung diseases—in particular, cystic fibrosis. At present, my interest centres on the role of chronic hypoxia on the development of CF lung disease. With this, I am also very interested in the epigenetic components of pathogenic changes in CF lung disease, with a focus on elucidating the impact of chronic hypoxia on such, and in turn, proposing novel treatment strategies/disease modelling techniques. Further, I would also like to pursue research on CFTR expression and regulation in the lung.”

Duprey, Kelsey

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biochemistry, Genetics, Molecular Biology

“I am interested in DNA repair and replication, cell cycle and chromosome segregation, epigenetics, and developmental biology. I am looking to work with Drosophila, C. elegans, zebrafish, or cell cultures.”

Muron, Savannah

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Genetics, Molecular Biology, Translational Medicine

“I am interested in the development and study of gene therapies and gene-editing technologies. I am most interested in studying potential effects of gene therapy in genetic diseases such as CF or in their technological development. I am also interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which gene editing technologies work and how they can be utilized to further their development and use in creating models and treating disease.”

Huang, Emma

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Genetics

“I would like to focus on developing statistical methods for modeling the effect of genetic variation among immunologic phenotypes in lung diseases, especially asthma.”

Blondel, Leo

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Genetics, Neurobiology, Translational Medicine

“I am interested in taking part in research aiming to understand the causes and progression of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases, as well as identifying potential therapeutic targets. I am interested in using my background in AAV gene therapy to participate in translational research projects and contribute to treatments for these conditions.”

Marquez Gonzalez, Ariana

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cell Biology, Genetics, Neurobiology

” I am interested in the molecular mechanisms behind neural disorders. I would enjoy continuing working with iPSCs models studying neuronal development as well as cell interactions between neurons and glial cells. I want to study epigenetic changes that contribute to neural disorders. How the environment plays a role in brain plasticity, and I would like to employ bioinformatics to model neuronal networks.”

Winfield, Brittanie

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Computational Biology, Genetics

“I am interested in studying at how life experiences and habits can influence diseases (mental health disorders, metabolism, cardiovascular health, etc. – not cancer) through epigenetic modifications. I hope to be able to do this research through a computational science and bioinformatics lens and to have access to human cohort data.”