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NameEmailPhD ProgramResearch InterestPublications
Zhang, Weiwei

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cardiovascular Biology, Drug Discovery, Genomics

“My research interests involve investigating the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases using methods such as single-cell sequencing, metabolomics, and transcriptomics to identify potential intervention targets for mitigating the progression of these diseases.”

Wang, Xing

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cardiovascular Biology, Immunology, Neurobiology, Stem Cells

“I am fascinated by the field of stem cell biology. The great potential and ground-breaking findings it presents motivate me to further investigate the mechanisms of how stem cells communicate with their environment and how they integrate signals to differentiate.”

Henley, Trevor

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cardiovascular Biology, Cell Biology, Developmental Biology

“I’m very interested in how cells handle ions in order to create different membrane potentials. I’m trying to look at this through the context of heart development, and cellular biology.”

Dutton, Josh

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cardiovascular Biology, Pathology, Translational Medicine

“I am interested in pursuing hematology, the pathology of blood diseases, and how that information can be applied to a clinical setting. Blood provides a very unique intersection of many research focuses, and I hope to research the complex pathways behind specific blood diseases.”

Azizoglu, Berfin
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Cell Biology & Physiology

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cardiovascular Biology, Cell Biology, Developmental Biology, Disease, Neurobiology, Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cells

Our lab studies body-wide control of organ growth and regeneration. The mammalian body is reticulated by blood vessels and neurons. How these networks communicate with organ cells to orchestrate local and body-wide decisions is obscure. We study this question with a focus on the mouse liver, the uniquely regenerative visceral organ. Current projects in the lab include 1-researching the role of a novel vascular progenitor network in liver regeneration, 2-determining the mechanisms of injury perception by liver innervation, and 3-in vitro assembly of reticulated, responsive liver tissue.

Leiderman, Karin
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Biochemistry & Biophysics, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biophysics, Cardiovascular Biology, Cell Signaling, Computational Biology, Enzymology, Hematology, Pharmacology, Quantitative Biology, Systems Biology

I am a mathematical biologist interested in the biochemical and biophysical aspects of blood clotting and emergent behavior in biological fluid-structure interaction problems. I especially love mathematical modeling, where creativity, biological knowledge, and mathematical insight meet. My goal is to use mathematical and computational modeling as a tool to learn something new about a biological system, not just to simply match model output to experimental data. My research paradigm includes an integration of mathematical and experimental approaches, together with statistical analyses and inference, to determine mechanisms underlying complex biological phenomena. This paradigm culminates in the contextualization of my findings to both the mathematical and biological communities. My research program is focused mainly on studying the influence of biochemical and biophysical mechanisms on blood coagulation, clot formation, and bleeding.

Edwards, Whitney

EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Cell Biology & Physiology

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cardiovascular Biology, Cardiovascular Disease, Cell Biology, Cell Signaling, Developmental Biology, Developmental Disorders, Disease, Genetic Basis of Disease, Metabolism, Molecular Biology, Molecular Mechanisms of Disease

Our lab aims to identify the fundamental molecular mechanisms underlying heart development and congenital heart disease. Our multifaceted approach includes primary cardiac cell culture, genetic mouse models, biochemical/molecular studies, and transcriptomics. Additionally, we employ proteomics-based methods to investigate 1) protein expression dynamics, 2) protein interaction networks, and 3) post-translational modifications (PTMs) in heart development. Current research projects focus on investigating the function of two essential PTMs in cardiogenesis: protein prenylation and palmitoylation.

Kim, Boa
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Cell Biology & Physiology, Pathobiology & Translational Science

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cardiovascular Biology, Cardiovascular Disease, Cell Biology, Metabolism, Microscopy, Molecular Mechanisms of Disease, Physiology

Endothelial cells, which comprise the innermost wall of all blood vessels, are involved in a broad range of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases that represent a global challenge with high morbidity. Endothelial cell metabolism is an active process, and altered endothelial metabolism drive disease progression. The research in my lab focuses on the molecular mechanisms of endothelial cell metabolism and how they affect cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

Maeda, Nobuyo

EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Genetics & Molecular Biology, Nutrition, Pathobiology & Translational Science

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cardiovascular Biology, Genetics, Metabolism, Pathology, Translational Medicine

Overall goal of our research is to gain better knowledge of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in common cardiovascular conditions in humans. We have been modifying mouse genome in such a way that resulting mice can model quantitative variations of a specific gene product that occur in human population. With these mice, we explore causes, mechanisms, and nutritional treatments of cardiovascular complications resulted from common conditions such as diabetes, lung infections, and pregnancy-associated hypertension. Current focus is on the oxidative stress and effects of vitamin B12 as antioxidant and beyond.

Wirka, Robert
WEBSITE
EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM
Cell Biology & Physiology

RESEARCH INTEREST
Bioinformatics, Cardiovascular Biology, Cell Biology, Genetics, Molecular Medicine

Our lab uses human genetics to identify new mechanisms driving coronary artery disease (CAD). Starting with findings from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of CAD, we identify the causal gene at a given locus, study the effect of this gene on cellular and vessel wall biology, and finally determine the molecular pathways by which this gene influences CAD risk. Within this framework, we use complex genetic mouse models and human vascular samples, single-cell transcriptomics/epigenomics and high-throughput CRISPR perturbations, as well as traditional molecular biology techniques.