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NameEmailPhD ProgramResearch InterestPublications
Capener, Jacob

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biochemistry, Biophysics, Pharmacology

Karthikeyan, Dhuvi

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biophysics, Computational Biology, Computational/Systems Immunology, Immunology

Neary, Alex

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biochemistry, Biophysics, Cell Biology

So, Christina

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biochemistry, Biophysics, Cell Biology

Yang, Chelsea

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Bioimaging, Biophysics

Hvasta, Matt

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biochemistry, Biophysics, Computational Biology

Mahmoud, Mohamed

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biophysics, Genetics, Molecular Biology

Lu, Zhiyue
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Chemistry

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biomaterials, Biophysics, Cell Signaling, Computational Biology, Drug Delivery, Systems Biology

Button, Brian
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Biochemistry & Biophysics

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biochemistry, Biomaterials, Biophysics, Cell Biology, Cell Signaling, Drug Delivery, Drug Discovery, Nanomedicine, Pathology, Physiology, Systems Biology, Translational Medicine

The Button lab in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics is part of the Marsico Lung Institute. Our lab is actively involved in projects that are designed to define the pathogenesis of muco-obstructive pulmonary disorders and to identify therapies that could be used to improve the quality of life in persons afflicted by these diseases. In particular, our research works to understand the biochemical and biophysical properties of mucin biopolymers, which give airway mucus its characteristic gel-like properties, and how they are altered in diseases such as Asthma, COPD, and cystic fibrosis.

Baker, Rick
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Biochemistry & Biophysics

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biochemistry, Biophysics, Cancer Biology, Molecular Biology, Structural Biology

Our lab is interested in the mechanisms of membrane trafficking in eukaryotic cells. Using a combination of biochemistry, in vitro reconstitution, and structural biology, we seek to understand how protein complexes assemble to bend and perturb membranes during vesicle budding (endocytosis) and vesicle fusion (exocytosis). Our group also specializes in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and we use semi-native substrates (nanodiscs, liposomes) to visualize complexes engaged with the membrane.