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NameEmailPhD ProgramResearch InterestPublications
Miller, Brian

EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Genetics & Molecular Biology

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cancer Biology, Genetics, Immunology, Systems Biology, Translational Medicine

The Miller lab is working to improve the efficacy of immunotherapy to treat cancer. We aim to develop personalized immunotherapy approaches based on a patient’s unique cancer mutations. We have a particular interest in myeloid cells, a poorly understood group of innate immune cells that regulate nearly all aspects of the immune response. Using patient samples, mouse models, single-cell profiling, and functional genomics approaches, we are working to identify novel myeloid-directed therapies that allow us to overcome resistance and successfully treat more patients.

Thaxton, Jessica
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Cell Biology & Physiology

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology, Metabolism

The Thaxton laboratory studies the intersection of stress and metabolism in immune cells for applications in cancer immunotherapy. Our pursuits center around the biology of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We aim to define how stress on the ER defines changes in protein homeostasis, metabolic fate, and antitumor efficacy of immune subsets in human tumors. In order to pursue our goals we collaborate vigorously with clinicians, creating a highly translational platform to expand our discoveries. Moreover, we design unique mouse models and use innovate technologies such as metabolic tracing, RNA-sequencing, and spectral flow cytometry to study how the stress of solid tumors impacts immune function. Ultimately, we aim to discover new ways to restore immune function in solid tumors to offer unique therapies for cancer patients.

Mock, Jason
WEBSITE
EMAIL
PUBLICATIONS

PHD PROGRAM
Microbiology & Immunology

RESEARCH INTEREST
Immunology, Physiology, Translational Medicine

Our research interests focus on investigating the reparative processes critical to the resolution of acute lung injury. Acute events such as pneumonia, inhalational injury, trauma, or sepsis often damage the lung, impeding its primary function, gas exchange. The clinical syndrome these events can lead to is termed Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). ARDS is a common pulmonary disease often seen and treated in intensive care units. Despite decades of research into the pathogenesis underlying the development of ARDS, mortality remains high. Our laboratory has built upon exciting observations by our group and others on the importance of how the lung repairs after injury. One type of white blood cell, the Foxp3+ regulatory T cell (Treg), appears essential in resolving ARDS in experimental models of lung injury–through modulating immune responses and enhancing alveolar epithelial proliferation and tissue repair. Importantly, Tregs are present in patients with ARDS, and our lab has found that subsets of Tregs may play a role in recovery from ARDS.

Coelho, Jenny

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Genetics, Immunology, Translational Medicine

Arias, Gaby

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Drug Delivery, Immunology, Pathogenesis & Infection

Bennett, Sarah

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cancer Biology, Immunology

Chen, Jingting

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biochemistry, Cancer Biology, Immunology, Pharmacology

Darwitz, Ben

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Bacteriology, Immunology, Pathogenesis & Infection

Fox, Geoff

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Cancer Biology, Immunology, Molecular Biology

Karthikeyan, Dhuvi

EMAIL

PHD PROGRAM

RESEARCH INTEREST
Biophysics, Computational Biology, Computational/Systems Immunology, Immunology