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[ PhD Program: Biomaterials Keyword: ]

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NameEmailPhd ProgramResearch InterestsPublications
Ainslie, Kristy M email , , , publications

We have several areas of research interest broadly in the area of immunomodulation using micro/nanoparticles and other carrier systems.  This can include development of traditional vaccines, therapeutic autoimmune vaccines and classic drug delivery platforms targeted to bacterial, viral or parasitic host cells.  To this end, we also seek to develop new materials and platforms optimal for use in modulating immune responses as well as developing scalable production of micro/nanoparticles.

Allbritton, Nancy email , , , , publications

The overall focus of the laboratory is to quantitatively measure the activity of proteins in cellular signaling networks to understand the relationships of these intracellular pathways in regulating cell health and disease. These networks are composed of interacting proteins and small molecules that work together in a concerted manner to regulate the cell in response to its environment. Despite the importance of these key signaling molecules in controlling the behavior of cells, most of these proteins and metabolites can not be quantified in single cells. There is a need throughout biology for new technologies to identify and understand the molecular circuits within single cells. A research goal is to develop new methods that will broaden the range of measurements possible at the single-cell level and then to utilize these methods to address fundamental biologic questions. We are pursuing this task by bringing to bear diverse techniques from chemistry, physics, biology and engineering to develop new analytical tools to track signal transduction within individual cells. Our research is a multidisciplinary program for the development and application of new analytical methods with two main focus areas: 1) techniques to monitor cellular signaling, and 2) microfabricated cellular analysis systems.

Berkowitz, Max email , , , , publications

We use computational techniques (multiscale molecular dynamics computer simulations) to study interactions of proteins and peptides with membranes and to study interactions of shock waves with membranes of neural cells. Specifically, we study the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with bacterial membranes to understand how they destroy such membranes.  In our study of shock wave interacting with brain tissue we investigate the importance of cavitation effect (collapse of bubbles) created by shock waves. Detailed molecular level knowledge of the processes we investigate using computational methodology is very helpful in understanding processes such as TBI (traumatic brain injury).  The computational methodology we use is also playing now an important role in the filed of drug design.  Member of the Molecular & Cellular Biophysics Training Program.

DeSimone, Joseph M. email , , , , publications

The direct fabrication and harvesting of monodisperse, shape-specific nano-biomaterials are presently being designed to reach new understandings and therapies in cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment.  Students interested in a rotation in the DeSimone group should not contact Dr. DeSimone directly.  Instead please contact Chris Luft at jluft@email.unc.edu.

Forest, Greg email , publications

Research interests include: transport processes in the lung, flow and structure of nano-materials & macromolecular fluids, weakly compressible transport phenomena, solitons and optical fiber applications, inverse problems for material characterization and modeling of transport in multiphase porous media.

Kier, William email , , , publications

I am interested in the comparative biomechanics of marine invertebrates.  In particular, I study the functional morphology of musculoskeletal systems, the structure, function, development and evolution of muscle, and invertebrate zoology, with particular emphasis on the biology of cephalopod molluscs (octopus and squid).  My research is conducted at a variety of levels and integrates the range from the behavior of the entire animal to the ultrastructure and biochemistry of its tissues.

Ko, Ching-Chang email , , , , publications

Ko’s laboratory has focused on bone regeneration using biomaterials and biomechanical approaches. The on-going project is to develop a new synthetic process for biomimetic bone nanocomposites. The new biomaterial and its scaffolds are under development for stem cell-mediated bone regeneration. Biomechanical principles that regulate mineral crystallization are incorporated with the biomaterial approach to translate research outcomes to clinical usage (e.g., immediately loaded dental implants). My lab is also interested in understanding reverse engineering principles of bio-mienralization.

Lai, Samuel email , , , , , , , , publications

Our dynamic group are broadly involve in three topics: (i) prevention of infectious diseases by harnessing interactions between secreted antibodies and mucus, (ii) immune response to biomaterials, and (iii) targeted delivery of nanomedicine.  Our group was the first to discover that secreted antibodies can interact with mucins to trap pathogens in mucus.  We are now harnessing this approach to engineer improved passive and active immuniation (i.e. vaccines) at mucosal surfaces, as well as understand their interplay with the mucosal microbiome.  We are also studying the adaptive immune response to polymers, including anti-PEG antibodies, and how it might impact the efficacy of PEGylated therapeutics.  Lastly, we are engineering fusion proteins that can guide targeted delivery of nanomedicine to heterogenous tumors and enable personalized medicine.

Macdonald, Jeffrey email , , , publications

Dr. Macdonald is the Founder and Scientific Director of the new Metabolomic Facility and Co-Scientific Director of the joint UNC/NCSU/NOAA Marine MRI facility at Pivers Island near Beaufort NC. Dr. Macdonald’s research goal is to combine metabolomics and tissue engineering and apply these tools to quantitative biosystem analysis.

Miller, Laura email , , , , , publications

Miller’s research group focuses on topics in integrative biophysics: physics applied to biology at the level of cells to organisms. In particular, the group is interested in the role of fluid forces during locomotion and morphogenesis. One ongoing project is focused on understanding the aerodynamics of flight in the smallest insects. Another current project investigates the role of fluid forces during the development of the embryonic vertebrate heart.

Wang, Andrew Z. email , , , , publications

My laboratory has two research directions. One is to utilize nanotechnology to develop novel diagnostics and therapeutics to improve cancer treatment. The other is to use techniques developed in tissue engineering to develop in vitro 3D models of cancer metastasis.