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[ PhD Program: Mineralized Tissue Keyword: ]

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NameEmailPhd ProgramResearch InterestsPublications
Everett, Eric T email , , , , , publications

Our research focuses upon craniofacial and mineralized tissue genetics; gene: environment interactions; mapping of complex traits; normal variation (to the extent that normal variation becomes abnormal); and animal models for oral/dental/craniofacial disorders.

Frazier-Bowers, Sylvia A. email , , , publications

My research interests include understanding the genetic basis of craniofacial anomalies relevant to the field of orthodontics.  Specifically, I investigate the genetic basis of dentofacial variation in a skeletal (mandibular prognathic) dentofacial phenotype (1-5% prevalence); tooth agenesis (congenitally missing teeth) and primary failure of eruption (a condition marked by the failure of teeth to erupt).  My current efforts focus on gene discovery and phenotype dissection of dentofacial variation using 1) 2 /3 dimensional methods for rigorous clinical characterization, 2) genotyping and linkage analysis and 3) mutational analysis using the candidate gene approach.

Ko, Ching-Chang email , , , , publications

Ko’s laboratory has focused on bone regeneration using biomaterials and biomechanical approaches. The on-going project is to develop a new synthetic process for biomimetic bone nanocomposites. The new biomaterial and its scaffolds are under development for stem cell-mediated bone regeneration. Biomechanical principles that regulate mineral crystallization are incorporated with the biomaterial approach to translate research outcomes to clinical usage (e.g., immediately loaded dental implants). My lab is also interested in understanding reverse engineering principles of bio-mienralization.

Wright, J. Timothy email , , , , publications

The Wright laboratory research is focused primarily on defining the phenotype and genotype relationships in a variety of craniofacial conditions such as amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta, ectodermal dysplasias, and the tricho-dento-osseous syndrome.  This is accomplished through a combination of human gene discovery approaches, the use of transgenic mice, and cell culture systems to explore mechanisms that explain genotype-phenotype relationships.  His most recent research includes investigation of the molecular controls of tooth formation as well as gene expression in tumorigenesis involving  odontogenic tumors such as ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors.