Faculty Database:
[Research Interest: Drug Delivery]

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NameEmailPhd ProgramResearch InterestsPublications
Ainslie, Kristy M email , , , publications

We have several areas of research interest broadly in the area of immunomodulation using micro/nanoparticles and other carrier systems.  This can include development of traditional vaccines, therapeutic autoimmune vaccines and classic drug delivery platforms targeted to bacterial, viral or parasitic host cells.  To this end, we also seek to develop new materials and platforms optimal for use in modulating immune responses as well as developing scalable production of micro/nanoparticles.

Anselmo, Aaron C. email , , , publications

The human body coexists with communities of microbes and bacteria called microbiota, and the balance of these microbes regulates both health and disease. In some cases, imbalances in microbiota have been linked to diseases, such as cancer and diabetes. My group will develop approaches and formulations to deliver specific compounds and microbes to modulate microbiota composition towards healthy states. Other research interests include the development of cell-mediated delivery systems, synthetic cells and nanoparticle drug-delivery systems for applications in vascular disease and cancer.

Bahnson, Edward Moreira email , , , , , , publications

We are interested in studying diabetic vasculopathies. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome have aggressive forms of vascular disease, possessing a greater likelihood of end-organ ischemia, as well as increased morbidity and mortality following vascular interventions. Our long term research aims to change the way we treat arterial disease in diabetes by:

  • Understanding why arterial disease is more aggressive in diabetic patients, with a focus in redox signaling in the vasculature.
  • Developing targeted systems using nanotechnology to locally deliver therapeutics to the diseased arteries.
Batrakova, Elena email , , publications

What if you can target and deliver a drug directly to the side of disease in the body? It is possible, when you use smart living creatures pro-inflammatory response cells, such as monocytes, T-lymphocytes or dendritic cells. You can load these cells with the drug and inject these carriers into the blood stream. They will migrate to the inflammation site (for example, across the blood brain barrier) and release the drug. Thus, you can reduce the inflammation and protect the cells (for example, neurons) in patients with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer diseases.

Han, Zongchao email , , , , publications

My research focus centers on retinal gene/drug therapy using nanotechnologies. My laboratory is interested in developing gene therapies for inherited blinding diseases and eye tumors. We are particularly interested in understanding the gene expression patterns that are regulated by the cis-regulatory elements. We utilize compacted DNA nanoparticles which have the ability to transfer large genetic messages to overcome various technical challenges and to appreciate the translational potential of this technology. This multidimensional technology also facilitated targeted drug delivery. Currently, we are working on the design and development of several specific nano formulations with targeting, bioimaging and controlled release specificities.

Hirsch, Matthew email , , , , , publications

Our lab works with adeno-associated viral vectors for both the characterization of vector and host responses upon transduction and as therapeutic agents for the treatment of genetic diseases.  In particular, we tend to focus on the 145 nucleotide viral inverted terminal repeats of the transgenic genome and their multiple functions including the replication initiation, inherent promoter activity, and stimulation of intra/inter molecular DNA repair pathways.  The modification of the AAV ITRs by synthetic sequences imparts unique functions/activities rendering these synthetic vectors perhaps better suited for therapeutic applications.

Huang, Leaf email , , publications

Dr. Huang is a pioneer in nanoparticle vectors for delivery of drugs, genes and vaccines. He has designed a core/membrane type nanoparticle which evades the macrophages in the liver and the spleen and deliver a large fraction of the injected dose to the target cells. The nanomedicine can encapsulate siRNA, peptide or chemotherapy drugs, either alone or in combination, resulting in effective inhibition of tumor growth. The Huang lab is also interested in designing peptide or mRNA vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. He uses nanoparticles as a tool to study the cross talks between cells in the tumor microenvironment.

Kabanov, Alexander (Sasha) email , , publications

In our lab we develop novel polymer based drug delivery systems and nanomedicines incorporating small molecules, DNA and polyptides to treat cancer, neurodegenerative and other CNS-related disorders.

Lai, Samuel email , , , , , , , , publications

Our dynamic group are broadly involve in three topics: (i) prevention of infectious diseases by harnessing interactions between secreted antibodies and mucus, (ii) immune response to biomaterials, and (iii) targeted delivery of nanomedicine.  Our group was the first to discover that secreted antibodies can interact with mucins to trap pathogens in mucus.  We are now harnessing this approach to engineer improved passive and active immuniation (i.e. vaccines) at mucosal surfaces, as well as understand their interplay with the mucosal microbiome.  We are also studying the adaptive immune response to polymers, including anti-PEG antibodies, and how it might impact the efficacy of PEGylated therapeutics.  Lastly, we are engineering fusion proteins that can guide targeted delivery of nanomedicine to heterogenous tumors and enable personalized medicine.

Wang, Andrew Z. email , , , , publications

My laboratory has two research directions. One is to utilize nanotechnology to develop novel diagnostics and therapeutics to improve cancer treatment. The other is to use techniques developed in tissue engineering to develop in vitro 3D models of cancer metastasis.